CBD Joints

@CBDJOINTS

CBD Flowers UK News

cbd flowers uk • Apr 05, 2021

News Letter CBD flowers UK

News Letter CBD flowers UK - Issue #4

By CBD FLOWERS UK • Issue #4


How Britain’s crown dependencies plan to cash in on cannabis

Weekly newsletter of Cbdflowersuk - Issue #1

https://www.getrevue.co/profile/cbdflowersuk/issues/weekly-newsletter-of-cbdflowersuk-issue-1-449100?utm_campaign=Issue&utm_content=view_in_browser&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Weekly+newsletter+of+Cbdflowersuk


Cbd flowers uk - Issue #2

https://www.getrevue.co/profile/cbdflowersuk/issues/cbd-flowers-uk-issue-2-450096


Weekly newsletter of Cbdflowersuk - Issue #3

https://www.getrevue.co/profile/cbdflowersuk/issues/weekly-newsletter-of-cbdflowersuk-issue-3-479844

Amsterdam-style cannabis cafes set to open in New York after state moves to legalise drug

Experts say it paves the way for a potential multi-billion dollar industry that could create tens of thousands of jobs

Consumer cannabidiol (CBD) products: call for evidence - GOV.UK

Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) call for evidence on cannabinoids in CBD products.

New York lawmakers reach deal on adult use recreational cannabis

ALBANY, N.Y. — New York lawmakers say it’s finally high time to legalize marijuana in the Empire State. Legislators reached a deal with Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office Wednesday on a plan to license dispensaries, opening the door for home delivery options and even allowing enthusiasts to grow their own limited number of pot plants, sources said. Under the agreement, cannabis use will be legal for

Scientists say they can spot high-CBD strains just from their leaves | The Cannigma

“Instead of ‘sativa vs indica,’ this paper focused more on the differentiation between three chemotypes: THC-dominant, intermediate (with intermediate THC and CBD levels), and CBD-dominant,” Jin explained. “Even within the current sativa and indica terminology, the strains described are still mostly THC dominant.

Identification of Phenotypic Characteristics in Three Chemotype Categories in the Genus Cannabis in: HortScience - Ahead of print

How AI (Artificial Intelligence) is Transforming the Cannabis Industry

AI is used in many areas, and now it is transforming the cannabis industry. From cultivation to sales, its applications are endless.

Pourquoi, après avoir dû fermer, les commerces de CBD reviennent en force à Orléans ? - Orléans (45000)

Une récente décision de l'Union européenne s'additionne à un marché “vierge” en pleine expansion.

Chris Daw QC: Top lawyer calls for the legalisation of drugs | JOE.co.uk

Chris Daw QC, one of the country’s most high-profile lawyers, has called for the legalisation of drugs in the UK in an interview with Ross Kemp

Legal cannabis products sold on the high street are facing a crackdown | Daily Mail Online

Ministers are also worried the widespread sale of CBD products is giving the misleading impression that the UK Government is softening its approach towards the Class B drug.

New York on the verge of legalizing recreational cannabis

New York is on the verge of legalizing recreational cannabis, with a vote expected as early as next week in the state Legislature.

CBD market 'not yet compliant' with the law - and tough new rules will soon come into force | UK News | Sky News

Nearly eight million Britons bought CBD last year, but 55% struggle to access reliable information about what they’re buying.

Are CBD Flowers Legal in the UK? - Nectar Medical Vapes

Today we’re going to be delving into the question of: are CBC flowers legal in the UK? As usual with UK drug laws, the answer is somewhat confusing, but we’ve fortunately done all of the research you need to know in order to understand the drug laws around CBD flowers. We’ll also throw in some information on how to safely purchase CBD flowers too. For good measure. As always, strap yourself in. Let’s go.

How to Buy the Best Organic CBD Oil & Hemp Flowers with Instant and Quick Delivery - Vents Magazine

High anxiety over federal weed loophole - POLITICO

CBD Flowers: What Are They, Are They Legal In The UK

Despite its increasing popularity of CBD products, one of the lesser-known CBD goods available to buy online is CBD flowers.

New York agrees to legalise cannabis, this is what happens next

New York lawmakers and governor Andrew Cuomo reached an agreement to legalise recreational marijuana, opening the door for a multi-billion dollar industry in the state. While the legislation was still begin finalised, multiple media outlets report that that “The Cannabis Law” was scheduled to pass next week as part of the state budget due on 1 April. It may, however, be fast-tracked once language is finalised to be voted on sooner as

New York state moves closer to legalising recreational cannabis - BBC News

Officials say they hope the new law will end the disproportionate policing of minority groups.

Smoking vs Vaping Delta 8 Flowers – Which Consumption Method is Better?

What’s better: Smoking or vaping Delta 8 flowers? What is the difference between the two most popular cananbis consumption methods…

CBD FLOWERS: WHAT ARE THEY? -

Alphagreen To Raise £2m Growth Funding At A Valuation Of £10m - BusinessCann

Boris Johnson to meet Inverclyde's MP for talks on medicinal cannabis | Greenock Telegraph

INVERCLYDE’S MP has challenged the Prime Minister to keep his promise and meet him to discuss the use of medicinal cannabis.

German Federal Supreme Court Says Sale of Hemp Flowers and Leaves Is Legal Except for Intoxicating Purposes

GERMAN FEDERAL SUPREME COURT SAYS SALE OF HEMP FLOWERS AND LEAVES IS LEGAL EXCEPT FOR INTOXICATING PURPOSES

German court clears tea sellers, marking path for food products

The high court’s ruling came in a case in which hemp tea sellers were charged with drug trafficking.

German court clears tea sellers, marking path for food products

The high court’s ruling came in a case in which hemp tea sellers were charged with drug trafficking.

Amsterdam-style cannabis cafes set to open in New York after state moves to legalise drug

Experts say it paves the way for a potential multi-billion dollar industry that could create tens of thousands of jobs

Amsterdam-style cannabis cafes set to open in New York after state moves to legalise drug

Experts say it paves the way for a potential multi-billion dollar industry that could create tens of thousands of jobs

CBD Flowers Seeds

CBD Flower Seeds UK 2021

Just miles off the coast of the UK, Britain’s crown dependencies smell opportunity in the air.

Typically known for their tax-friendly regulation and as an outpost for wealthy entrepreneurs, the Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey have all introduced new legislation allowing for easier investment in a new and emerging market - medicinal cannabis cultivation.

In January, the Isle of Man’s parliament approved plans to sell licences to grow and export cannabis for medicinal use. As a crown dependency, like both Guernsey and Jersey, it is self governing - meaning it does not need to wait for permission from the UK government.

Enterprise minister Laurence Skelly said new regulations on cannabis cultivation had been a “long time coming”. He’s hoping the island can steal a march on the UK.

“We want to make sure it [medicinal cannabis] is a high quality product so we’re at the top end of the market and we’re attracting the right investment. We’ve put the framework in place and already the interest has been fantastic,” he said.

Medicinal cannabis oil can be prescribed to people with severe epilepsy or MS.

“All we’ve done is managed to accelerate things but competition will come along, whether from the UK or elsewhere. What we’ll try and do is carve out a niche market that’s at the high end of the market. We’re a small nation but we’re a diverse economic community.”

Dozens of firms, both overseas and locally, have enquired about setting up on the island. One local entrepreneur is already planning to build a 150,000 square foot indoor premises to grow medicinal cannabis. Other firms could also be up and running as early as this year.

“If we need to create legislation which suits an industry that we think will benefit us, we’ll do that,” Mr Skelly said. “The regulation is key to our success.”

Mr Skelly said one firm had enquired about setting up inside the Isle of Man’s ‘airport technology gateway’, connecting it to the island’s freeport. In turn, this would mean the business would not pay import, export and excise duty, helping to reduce costs and making it a more competitive.

Freeports were a key policy pledge at the Budget earlier this year, but the Isle of Man has had an operating freeport for several decades, making it an attractive proposition for businesses looking to enter the market now while saving on costs.

“As I see it, it’s another opportunity to facilitate easy access and low-level bureaucracy to enable businesses to do what they do well,” Mr Skelly said.

Rishi Sunak (with Boris Johnson) spoke about the economic opportunities freeports could bring to the UK.

“The one big one [cannabis firm] we’ve got is specifically designed to be in what we call the airport technology gateway, which as the name suggests is right next to our airport, so you can export this far and wide very quickly.

“I would suggest it’s a logistics benefit more than anything else. I think one of the key elements in the UK was to avoid import taxes if you operate out of a freeport.“

Jersey is also trying to establish itself in an emerging market, issuing its first licences for the commercial growing of medicinal cannabis - the first of its kind in the Channel Islands.

Economic development minister Lyndon Farnham hailed the move as the “birth of a new economic sector” for the island.

Senator Farnham said: “It will have an important economic impact, driving high-value economic diversification, creating jobs, encouraging inward investment and generating tax new revenues to support economic recovery.

“I see the Island’s growing medicinal cannabis sector as the ideal base for companies across the world, looking to expand into the European market.

“Jersey is perfectly placed to be part of a new industry that is about the provision of medicine, innovative cutting-edge science, high-value agriculture, the creation of intellectual property and global regulation,” he told the Jersey Evening Post.

Northern Leaf was awarded a licence to grow cannabis for medicinal use in Jersey earlier this year. It became only the second company to be granted a UK licence for commercial marijuana cultivation after GW Pharmaceuticals, which was first granted its permit in 1998.

CBD, a non-psychoactive element in cannabis, is sold on UK high streets.

Meanwhile, in Guernsey, ministers issued clarification on potential Proceeds of Criminal Acts (POCA) conflicts, designed to make it easier for people and businesses looking to invest in medicinal cannabis production.

If a UK-based person or company invested in a medicinal cannabis firm which also had a recreational cannabis arm to its business - such as in the USA or Canada where both are legal - they could face a prison term or heavy fine as any dividends could be classed a proceeds of crime, as recreational cannabis remains illegal in the UK.

But under new guidance in Guernsey, firms can invest in recreational cannabis if it is lawful in the country of origin.

Robert Jappie, a partner at Ince Gordon Dadds, said: “The Crown Dependencies are taking the lead in creating favourable regulatory environments for cannabis business to operate in.

“By providing detailed guidance on compliance requirements, they have become increasingly desirable jurisdictions for cannabis companies. The licensing regimes are well structured, and the regulators are supportive.”

Meanwhile, on the mainland, the UK remains a big player in the global market, exporting more medicinal cannabis than anywhere else in the world.

However, new entrants claim that the Home Office, which signs off on cultivation licences, is reluctant to help develop an emerging market. GW Pharmaceuticals and its suppliers retain a tight grip on the market, as it is one of the only firms allowed to grow cannabis strong enough for medical use.

A Home Office spokesperson said: “Companies wishing to cultivate cannabis require Home Office Controlled Drug licenses to lawfully undertake these activities.

"The Home Office Drugs and Firearms Licensing Unit operate a robust but proportionate licensing regime which permits cannabis cultivation for lawful purposes. The licensing regime exists to protect the public by enabling safe and lawful access to drug materials, whilst preventing diversion of drugs or their unlawful or unsafe use.”

Cannabis is legal in some US states and products containing CBD - items derived from cannabis but without the THC - are sold across the UK.

Ant Lehane, head of communications at Volteface, an advocacy organisation which seeks to reduce the harm drugs pose to individuals and society, said: “Legal sovereignty post-Brexit simplifies many of these previously complex issues, such as policy related to hemp and the extraction of CBD - Volteface will be providing the solutions to these issues in our upcoming report Pleasant Lands.

“The fact that Novel Foods legislation kicks in later this month, legal clarity primes the UK to take a march on the EU and make the UK the European hub for cultivation, extraction, investment and export.”

Medicinal cannabis is becoming an increasingly attractive market for businesses across the world. As more research is carried out into how medicinal cannabis could help treat multiple conditions, from everything from cancer and Crohn’s disease, to epilepsy and glaucoma, venture capital firms are increasingly attracted by the high growth potential in the market.

Worldwide, the global medicinal cannabis market size was valued at £5.64 ($7.8bn) in 2020. The IMARC Group, a leading management strategy group, estimate the market is expected to grow by 15.3% from 2021 to 2026.

But the UK could have a fight on their hands. The head-start Britain's crown dependencies have got over the UK, coupled with the added benefits of 0% corporation tax, could prove too enticing to pass up on.

Could UK's Covid crisis lead to cannabis legalisation?

Cannabis-based medicine available on NHS

Is the craze for CBD oil justified or just crazy?

CBD crackdown Home Office plans will destroy UK hemp farming

The Tories are taking an already-illogical crackdown to the next level

The UK’s CBD market is one of the largest in Europe, with over 1.3m people buying into this £300m industry.

It’s a bigger market than the Vitamin D and C markets combined, for a product – cannabidiol – that is safe, non-psychoactive and non-addictive. And it looks like the government is about to ban its production in the UK.

Harvesting hemp flowers is illegal in the UK. Because of this, all CBD available for purchase here is imported. Any business importing CBD must secure a Schedule 1 Controlled Drug Licence, as cannabis (and therefore hemp) remains firmly on the Home Office’s list of Controlled Substances.

And now, from March 31st 2021, the much-criticised Novel Foods legislation will require any CBD product for consumption here to have a validated dossier with the UK Food Standards Agency

The crackdown

Novel Foods regulations cover stringent testing of any food consumed by humans after 1997. The very notion of calling hemp a ‘Novel Food’ is questionable, as this crop has been produced and consumed by humans for thousands of years.

As stated by the European Industrial Hemp Association (EIHA), “hemp leaves and flowers…are traditional foods and do not fall under the scope of the Novel Food Regulation”. This was confirmed by the EU Standing Committee for Foodstuffs in December 1997. By this logic, CBD products with similar strengths to the natural plant extract of up to 5% should be freely available for consumers and businesses alike.

But the CBD explosion over recent years has led to a cynical response by government bodies to restrict products which help millions of people, including those who suffer from anxiety.

Regulation of the CBD market is not necessarily a bad thing in and of itself. But when this regulation comes at the cost of consumer access and ethical business models, we must ask ourselves who benefits.

With mental illness rising and with support often difficult to access, more people are looking to alternatives to expensive medication with pages of undesirable side effects.

Enter CBD. The human body – like all mammals – is kept in balance by the endocannabinoid system. Cannabinoids are present in many plants, but the greatest number are found in cannabis. Industrial hemp (cannabis sativa) is high in cannabidiol (CBD) and low in THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). With all controlled substances (of which THC – the psychoactive compound in cannabis – is included), the legal limit per product is 1mg.

In January 2021, Kit Malthouse, Minister of State for Crime and Policing, announced that there would be changes to this legislation, changing from setting a maximum total quantity of THC in a product to a percentage. Logical, in that 1mg THC in a 10ml bottle of CBD is a far higher proportion than 1mg THC in a 100L barrel.

However, the proposed changes were not in line with any of the latest research and the ever-mounting evidence supporting natural cannabinoid levels found in the plant.

The new permissible levels for all products sold in the UK will be of either 0.01% THC, or 0.0001% THC.

When we are already talking about such trace levels as to be undetectable by consumers, why such astoundingly low quantities? What does this mean in practice?

When hemp extract is processed from flowers, many plant compounds and phytonutrients remain in the resin. These, along with additional cannabinoids, create what is called the ‘entourage effect’: when you take a naturally-sourced CBD extract, the benefits of all the other plant compounds and their interaction with each other creates a more effective product.

With a THC limit of 0.0001%, using whole plant extract in products will no longer be possible. The CBD must be isolated and removed from all the other plant material – or the CBD must be created synthetically in a lab.

In practice, this means UK CBD legislation is aligning to support the big players with political clout, and crush the independents. Under these new regulations, CBD will only be legally sourced from a small number of big suppliers.

Anti-hemp Home Office

Naturally derived hemp extract is good for the planet and contributes millions to the struggling economy. So what reason is there to prevent its production on UK soil?

The Home Office is responsible for the control of cannabis – despite industrial hemp being a crop with no psychoactive properties – under the catch-all of Drugs and Firearms.

The proposed THC limits for CBD products are not evidence based and are highly destructive for the ethical development of the industrial hemp market.

These regulations are a betrayal of our heritage. They are a continuation of the coordinated demonisation and prohibition of the cannabis plant over the course of the last century.

Stand up for green growth

We’re demanding that Industrial Hemp is removed from the Misuse of Drugs Act so that the whole plant can be freely grown and consumed.

We also demand that the Novel Foods process is reassessed so that at the very minimum, whole plant extracts with natural cannabinoid thresholds can be sold and distributed on the open market.

The Seed Our Future campaign have drafted a letter for concerned CBD users requesting answers regarding the government’s stance.

FastForward Innovations Ltd

cbd flowers uk

FastForward innovations

#ffwd FastForward Innovations is an AIM quoted investment company focused primarily on disruptive high growth life sciences and technology businesses particularly within the medical cannabis arena.

#FFWD #YOOMA #LGP #SWB #NorthernLeaf

The Company’s strategy is to identify early-stage opportunities that have an upcoming investment catalyst and grow its portfolio in terms of value whilst limiting the number of investee companies to a level where relevant time can be devoted to each.

FastForward Innovations hails #NorthernLeaf investment

FastForward Innovations Ltd (LON:FFWD) said it has taken part in the £14mln pre-IPO funding round for f, the Jersey-based medical cannabis group

It received £600,000-worth of convertible loan notes in the heavily over-subscribed issue.

Chief executive Ed McDermott said, "Having become the first company to be awarded a UK licence to grow medicinal cannabis in 22 years late last year, Northern Leaf is focused on becoming a key player in the rapidly burgeoning European medical cannabis supply chain.

“We are delighted to back a competent team as they look to accelerate this strategy and use the funds raised to commence its commercial medicinal cannabis grow programme.

“Again, given we understand the fundraise was heavily oversubscribed, we are pleased with the investment we have secured in the raise and look forward to supporting the company in progressing its strategy."

#ffwd investments

LGP

$1.00 million (£560,000.00) in a placing undertaken by Little Green Pharma, an ASX-Listed, vertically integrated, medicinal cannabis business with operations from cultivation and production through to manufacturing and distribution.

The LGP placing raised a total of A$22.00 million at a price of $0.65c; accordingly, FFWD expects to hold 0.9% of the company following issue of the placing shares.

FastForward invested £250,000 into South West Brands, a London-based group that that is seeking to establish itself as a multi-brand consumer goods group developed specifically for the CBD industry

Yooma completed its reverse take-over of Globalive and the new combined company, Yooma Wellness, began trading on the Canadian Securities Exchange on the 11 February 2021

FastForward invested A$1 million (£563,000) into Little Green Pharma, an ASX-listed, vertically integrated medicinal cannabis business with operations from cultivation and production through to manufacturing and distribution

Ed McDermott, CEO of FastForward Innovations, commented: “We are delighted with the way our portfolio is evolving.

We now have a really good mix of liquid, pre-liquidity and longer term investments as well as a good cash position to make further investments which taken together greatly reduces the risk of our portfolio whilst giving much clearer visibility on potential returns.

Investor interest in the cannabinoid sector is escalating with several new companies nearing listing or recently listed on a UK exchange.

This can only be good for the sector as a whole, raising its profile and making it more mainstream. “Ongoing clinical research into Cannabis/cannabinoidsis beginning to show efficacy in helping certain conditions.

Having been involved in the sector for several years and with five investee companies operating within the space, we are ideally positioned to benefit from this growth and cement our position as a leading investor in the sector.

At present we remain the only AIM listed company investing in the sector.

“We are pleased to have expanded our exposure to the health and medical cannabis sector, capitalising on our knowledge and experience and our ambition is to invest further in the sector during the course of 2021.

Whilst clearly cannabis is a focus at present our portfolio is well balanced with a number of non-cannabis assets such as Leap Gaming and Juvenescence both of which we hope will secure liquidity events in 2021 as well as Portage which has just transitioned to the NASDAQ.

“With a wide portfolio of ground-breaking businesses, products, and technologies, I believe that FastForward has reached a tipping point and that shareholders will be substantially rewarded for their support.”

South West Brands is a London-based group that that is seeking to establish itself as a multi-brand consumer goods group developed specifically for the CBD industry.

Its all-female management team is led by CEO Rebekah Hall, who is a pioneer in the burgeoning CBD market in Europe and regarded as one of the foremost experts on CBD consumer products.

On 1 February 2021, FastForward announced that it had made an initial investment of £250,000 in South West Brands (‘SWB’) by way of a two-year Convertible Loan Note, adding to its growing portfolio of cannabis-focused investments.

The funding round raised a total of £500,000, which will be used to launch and market SWB’s pipeline of new CBD brands across multiple product verticals, including its first new brands in the menstrual cycle care and beauty categories in April 2021.

Yooma intends to integrate the EMMAC Brands into its existing sales channels in Asia, including cross-border ecommerce in China on various Alibaba platforms, accelerating growth and driving new market entry for EMMAC.

Most recently, on 26 January 2021, EMMAC announced that in partnership with Paris Euronext listed Boiron, it has been selected by the French Agency for the Safety of Medicines and Health Products as one of the suppliers for the forthcoming French Medical Cannabis trial.

The trial, the first of its kind in France, will allow 3,000 patients access to medical cannabis as a treatment option for certain indications; including chronic pain, epilepsy, oncology, and spasticity; under tightly controlled conditions.

The partnership combines Boiron's unparalleled expertise in plant-based medicine, with EMMAC's uniquely controlled European supply chain, from seed to patient, in order to deliver pharmaceutical-grade cannabis medicines that meet the strict requirements of product quality, safety and traceability.

Little Green Pharma (ASX: LGP) is an ASX-listed, vertically integrated medicinal cannabis business with operations from cultivation and production through to manufacturing and distribution. Little Green Pharma (‘LGP’) has an indoor cultivation facility and manufacturing facility in Western Australia to produce its own-branded range of GMP-grade medicinal cannabis products. Its growing product range comply with all required Therapeutic Goods Administration regulations and testing requirements. With a growing range of products containing differing ratios of active ingredients, LGP supplies medical-grade cannabis products to Australian and overseas markets. Recently, it has made progress in the establishment of offshore distribution channels including to the UK, Germany, and New Zealand to further strengthen its geographic reach. On 11 February 2021, FastForward announced that it has invested A$1 million (£563,000) in a placing undertaken by LGP through which it raised a total of A$22 million at a price of $0.65c. The funds will be used to execute LGP's next phase of growth by accelerating sales and marketing efforts in Australia and in offshore markets; expanding cultivation and manufacturing capacity; and providing general working capital. The investment further develops FastForward’s exposure to the medicinal cannabis industry and the Company looks forward to supporting LGP and its management in the coming months. Following this, on 18 February 2021, LGP announced that it will be exclusively supplying medicinal cannabis oil products to enrolled patients as well as providing funding for study costs for the QUality of life Evaluation STudy (‘The QUEST Initiative’). The QUEST Initiative, which is being conducted by researchers at the University of Sydney, aims to be one of the world's largest longitudinal studies investigating the quality of life and health economics on patients with chronic disease prescribed medicinal cannabis.

Yooma Wellness Inc. (CNSX: YOOM) is Asia’s first HEMP and CBD Lifestyle company, which delivers products to consumers through exclusive distribution of third-party skincare and beauty brands utilising its data-driven digital marketing expertise. On 11 February 2021, Yooma completed its reverse take-over of Globalive Technology Inc. by way of a statutory plan of arrangement and the new combined company, Yooma Wellness, began trading on the Canadian Securities Exchange on the same day under the ticker symbol ‘YOOM’. As the first of four of FastForward’s investee companies gearing up for a liquidity event, this was extremely positive news, and the Board is confident that the listing will pave Yooma’s way towards strengthening its global footprint. Based on the closing price of CAN$1.450 on 23 February 2021, FastForward’s holding of 4,007,165 shares in Yooma has a valuation of CAN$5,810,389 (£3,274,566).

South West Brands

£250,000 in South West Brands Limited, a London- based, group that is seeking to establish itself as a multi-brand consumer goods group developed specifically for the CBD industry.

Investing in the UK’s Small Cap Medicinal Cannabis Stocks

Time to invest in the UK’s Small Cap Medicinal Cannabis Stocks?

“…But institutional recognition may not be far away. Backed by a growing consumer base, increasing recognition from financial regulators and governments – medicinal cannabis is now legal in more than 40 countries – the sector is on a strong upwards trajectory…”

Global marijuana markets and interest are growing like a weed. Today, cannabis presents itself as an established industry where expectations have become realistic and achievable. As rampant growth becomes secondary to profitability and positive balance sheets, many companies still present huge opportunities for investors of every kind. With this type of impressive growth, it’s no wonder that many investors are interested in the sector.

So, what’s the best approach to investing in marijuana? Below, we look at how to consider investing into this exciting sector.

FFWD

During a tough year of lockdowns, home schooling, and job insecurity, many have turned to alternative medicines to help relieve anxiety, insomnia, depression, and other conditions.

Medicinal cannabis products have sold in unprecedented numbers in Europe and the US as consumers increasingly recognise their therapeutic value. Growing sales, a change in UK regulations allowing medicinal cannabis producers to list on the London Stock Exchange, and the prospect of further liberalisation in the US have made cannabis stocks one of this year’s most fashionable trades.

But there remains much confusion about the implications of the new regulations for investors, and, indeed, what what medicinal cannabis actually is.

On cannabis and cannabinoids

So let’s start with a few definitions. Cannabis is a plant that has been farmed for thousands of years for its medicinal and recreational properties. Medicinal cannabis products use cannabinoids, a group of compounds found in hemp, a strain of the cannabis plant. There are more than 100 known cannabinoids. But the CBD compound has the widest medical application, engaging positively with the body’s receptors to provide pain relief and treat conditions such as insomnia, anxiety, epilepsy, skin irritations, and stress disorders. Other strands including CBN, CBG, CBL and CBC, might have the potential to treat Parkinson’s disease and other serious ailments.

Crucially, from a legal perspective, cannabinoids do not produce the psychoactive states with which cannabis is popularly associated, which are stimulated by another of the plant’s chemicals, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Medicinal cannabis can only contain trace amounts of THC.

Hemp’s remarkable properties make it useful beyond medicine. More than 25,000 emissions-reducing products can be made from the substance, including natural fibre composite automotive parts and even carbon-neutral concrete.

The new UK regulations for cannabis producers

The financial regulations governing the medicinal cannabis sector might seem even more complex than the plant’s chemistry. The UK legalised medicinal cannabis in 2018, allowing doctors to prescribe it for medical use. But the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) only gave the green light for UK-based medicinal cannabis companies – with the right Home Office licences – to list on the LSE last autumn. The ruling led to a surge in companies applying to list, and, of course, investor interest: retail investors have poured more than £300m into cannabis stocks since companies began to list in February.

The new UK rules will further strengthen a flourishing European cannabis market. Despite popular belief recreational cannabis use remains illegal across Europe, including the Netherlands and Portugal, where personal possession is only permitted up to a certain limit. But some forecasts estimate the European CBD market will be worth more than €13.6bn by 2025.

Significantly, the new FCA regulations allow overseas companies to list on the LSE as long as they can prove that their operations in their country of origin would be legal if carried out in the UK. So, for example, a Dutch company selling recreational marijuana can’t join the exchange. With the line between recreational and medicinal cannabis use blurred in several jurisdictions, it looks like that will be a tough condition to monitor. But, even so, the new rules open the LSE as a possible home for a growing international ecosystem of cannabis producers.

The US market, where legal cannabis sales reached $17.5bn last year, 46pc up from 2019, is expected to grow rapidly in the wake of the Presidential election. The Biden administration has promised to legalise medicinal cannabis at federal level; indeed Vice President Kamala Harris was the lead sponsor of a 2019 bill that sought to end federal prohibition of marijuana.

That matters, because although medicinal cannabis is already legal in 15 states, the current federal rule prevents US companies from listing on US exchanges. Somewhat confusingly, Canadian cannabis producers are able to list on US exchanges because they operate legally in Canada, which became the largest economy to legalise cannabis consumption for any purpose – whether medical or recreational – three years ago.

Discerning investment opportunities

As demand for medicinal cannabis continues to rise, and financial and legal regulations are gradually loosened, investors seeking a new growth market have flocked to the sector. But the investment opportunities the market offers are still rather hazy.

Funds don’t yet provide an option. Compliance teams at large asset managers are still wary of the sector: investing in a medical cannabis company that also works with recreational cannabis elsewhere in the world would be a breach of UK law, and due diligence on medical cannabis companies is currently capital and labour intensive. And, moreover, the market cap of recently listed medical marijuana companies in the UK is too small for them to take notice.

As things stand investors are obliged to put money into single cannabis stocks or invest through



a small number of ETFs. Money has flowed into international cannabis-tracking ETFs this year, reaching an all-time high of $1.9bn, with January flows of $527m tripling December figures that were themselves a record. Europe’s two leading ETFs so far this year both track cannabis stocks. The $44.1m Rize Medical Cannabis and Life Sciences UCITS ETF (LSE:FLWR) and $54.3m HANetf Medical Cannabis and Wellness UCITS ETF (LSE:CBDX), rose 45.2pc and 43.2pc respectively by 12 February, continuing strong performances from the previous year, during which CBDX returned 99pc in the year to 12 February and FLWR 87pc.But cannabis ETFs are not necessarily all that they seem. There are still so few investment-grade cannabis companies in the sector that cannabis ETF holdings have significant overlaps, and their indices are diluted by the inclusion of a large percentage of companies specialising in sectors such as property or fertiliser.

A Financial Times analysis of the 59 companies included in eight major cannabis ETFs found that 43 made a loss over their last reported 12-month period, 27 made net losses larger than their total revenue, and six – with a combined market capitalisation of $794m – had no sales at all. Indeed, of the 16 indexed companies that were profitable, 14 were not primarily cannabis companies at all, only tangentially associated with the industry.

Prospective investors should also note that fledging cannabis stocks are extremely volatile. Almost as soon as they listed UK cannabis companies faced huge short positions taken by both institutional and retail investors. In the US, three of the top five most firms discussed last month on the colourful Reddit r/WallStreetBets forum were cannabis companies. After their strong performance through 2020 and early this year leading US cannabis stocks plummeted between 20 and 40pc. In Europe, Tilray, for a time the most traded stock on the German platform Lang & Schwarz, with more than $2.7m turnover, was pushed down by more than 40pc.

Fast Forward (AIM:FFWD), a capital market company focused innovations in the wellness and life sciences sectors, is another with keen interest in this year’s developments in the medicinal cannabis space.

Fast Forward’s wide ranging portfolio includes a stake taken last month in Little Green Pharma (ASX:LGP), the first medical cannabis company in Australia to produce locally-grown medical-grade cannabis products. Little Green Pharma produces its own branded range of medicinal cannabis products through an indoor cultivation facility and manufacturing facility in Western Australia.

Fast Forward, which offers exposure to investment opportunities often reserved for the private market of venture capital firms, was highly active in this year’s LSE cannabis listings. Earlier this month it sold stakes in Kanabo and Cellular Goods, and a considerable holding in EMMAC worth more than £5m, following EMMAC’s takeover by leading Canadian cannabis retailer Curaleaf Holdings (CNSX).

EMMAC, a European leader in the production and supply of medical cannabis, hemp and other derivative products, has a network of supply and distribution partnerships throughout Europe and the UK. Its acquisition by Curaleaf, which operates more than 100 cannabis shops in 23 US states earlier this month, indicates the growing North American interest in the possibilities of the European market.

The medicinal cannabis sector presents an exciting but voluble new investment opportunity. These are very early days for cannabis stocks on UK markets. Despite formal FCA approval, they have yet to gain full institutional acceptance. Just now the market consists of a few small caps trading at many hundreds of times their revenue. Getting the NHS properly on board is a necessary step to medical cannabis becoming a major UK industry: the NHS is still cautious about prescribing medicinal cannabis as a regular treatment.

But institutional recognition may not be far away. Backed by a growing consumer base, increasing recognition from financial regulators and governments – medicinal cannabis is now legal in more than 40 countries – the sector is on a strong upwards trajectory. We have tried to pick out some of the companies worth following that provide a decent index to the fortunes of a space that is definitely worth watching.

cbdflowersuk • Apr 05, 2021

CBD Flowers Online UK 2021

News Letter CBD flowers UK

Issue #4

How Britain's crown dependencies plan to cash in on cannabis | ITV News

The Isle of Man, Guernsey and Jersey have all introduced legislation designed at making it easier for firms to invest in medicinal cannabis.

The pot power list — the celebrities investing in cannabis | Magazine | The Times

Mike Tyson has his own premium strain. David Beckham is an investor. Even Martha Stewart has jumped on the cannabis rush with a line of CBD dog treats. But it’s not just celebrities enjoying the




Legal cannabis products sold on the high street are facing a crackdown | Daily Mail Online


Ministers are also worried the widespread sale of CBD products is giving the misleading impression that the UK Government is softening its approach towards the Class B drug.




The British invasion: Michelin-starred chef enters CBD-infused beverage space with elevated flavor profiles


The CBD beverages space is not for the faint-hearted given the regulatory minefield brands have to navigate, but Isca is hoping to bring a more culinary twist to the nascent category with the assistance of British Michelin-starred Chef Michael Caines.




CBD Brands Get Revenue Boost with Hemp Pre-Rolls


Hemp farmers are making money from nose to tail with their products thanks to a strong market for CBD pre-rolls. According to Grandview Research, the global CBD market was valued at US $4.6 billion in 2018 and is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 22.2 percent from 2019 to 2025. Harrison




British Hemp Alliance – Seeding the future of British Hemp


British Hemp Alliance – Seeding the future of British Hemp




CBD market 'not yet compliant' with the law - and tough new rules will soon come into force | UK News | Sky News


Nearly eight million Britons bought CBD last year, but 55% struggle to access reliable information about what they’re buying.




Are CBD buds illegal in the UK? - The Cannavist Magazine


From vape shops to head shops to online stores, CBD buds are widely available. And, as some sellers claim, completely legal. But are they?




BREAKING: Malta Will Allow People To Grow Up To Four Cannabis Plants In Major Weed Reform




NYPD memo tells cops they can't search cars over marijuana smell alone | Daily Mail Online


The NYPD on Wednesday circulated a memo to all of its commands, explaining the new laws governing the possession, sale and use of marijuana, which were adopted by New York State.


Is CBD flower legal in the UK? - leafie


CBD flowers or CBD buds, whatever you call them they’re openly available in shops and online. But many people are questioning if they are legal. We have the definitive answer in our article.


Why Does Social Media Still Ban Cannabis? - The Fresh Toast


The Fresh Toast - Why does social media still get testy around marijuana and what can you do about it? - Cannabusiness


Investing in the UK's Small Cap Medicinal Cannabis Stocks - Total Market Solutions




CBD Flowers: What Are They, Are They Legal In The UK


Despite its increasing popularity of CBD products, one of the lesser-known CBD goods available to buy online is CBD flowers.


New York state lawmakers agree to legalise recreational cannabis | US News | Sky News


After several failed attempts to legalise the drug, it now appears recreational use will finally get the green light.


Over 100 CBD Businesses Given April 1 Deadline By Leading UK Payment Firm - BusinessCann


In 2021 Is CBD Flower Legal In The UK? • Training Piit


You may have seen the flower on the counter and thought to yourself “How are they doing this?” or even "Is CBD Flower Legal in the UK?”


High-CBD Strains for Anxiety: 12 to Consider


Cannabis and anxiety have a complicated relationship. For some, cannabis works wonders for their symptoms, but for others, it ramps them up. If you’re looking to use cannabis for anxiety, high-CBD strains are probably your safest bet.





How Britain's crown dependencies plan to cash in on cannabis



A number of Britain's crown dependencies are beginning to introduce legislation around medicinal cannabis




The CBD Flower Report

by @cbdflowersuk multimedia




Just miles off the coast of the South West Devon and Cornwall UK, Britain’s crown dependencies smell opportunity in the air.




Typically known for their tax-friendly regulation and as an outpost for wealthy entrepreneurs, the Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey have all introduced new legislation allowing for easier investment in a new and emerging market - medicinal cannabis cultivation.




In January, the Isle of Man’s parliament approved plans to sell licences to grow and export cannabis for medicinal use. As a crown dependency, like both Guernsey and Jersey, it is self governing - meaning it does not need to wait for permission from the UK government.




Enterprise minister Laurence Skelly said new regulations on cannabis cultivation had been a “long time coming”. He’s hoping the island can steal a march on the UK.




“We want to make sure it [medicinal cannabis] is a high quality product so we’re at the top end of the market and we’re attracting the right investment. We’ve put the framework in place and already the interest has been fantastic,” he said.




Medicinal cannabis oil can be prescribed to people with severe epilepsy or MS.




“All we’ve done is managed to accelerate things but competition will come along, whether from the UK or elsewhere. What we’ll try and do is carve out a niche market that’s at the high end of the market. We’re a small nation but we’re a diverse economic community.”




Dozens of firms, both overseas and locally, have enquired about setting up on the island. One local entrepreneur is already planning to build a 150,000 square foot indoor premises to grow medicinal cannabis. Other firms could also be up and running as early as this year.




“If we need to create legislation which suits an industry that we think will benefit us, we’ll do that,” Mr Skelly said. “The regulation is key to our success.”




Mr Skelly said one firm had enquired about setting up inside the Isle of Man’s ‘airport technology gateway’, connecting it to the island’s freeport. In turn, this would mean the business would not pay import, export and excise duty, helping to reduce costs and making it a more competitive.




Freeports were a key policy pledge at the Budget earlier this year, but the Isle of Man has had an operating freeport for several decades, making it an attractive proposition for businesses looking to enter the market now while saving on costs.




“As I see it, it’s another opportunity to facilitate easy access and low-level bureaucracy to enable businesses to do what they do well,” Mr Skelly said.




Rishi Sunak spoke about the economic opportunities freeports could bring to the UK.




“The one big one [cannabis firm] we’ve got is specifically designed to be in what we call the airport technology gateway, which as the name suggests is right next to our airport, so you can export this far and wide very quickly.




“I would suggest it’s a logistics benefit more than anything else. I think one of the key elements in the UK was to avoid import taxes if you operate out of a freeport.“




Jersey is also trying to establish itself in an emerging market, issuing its first licences for the commercial growing of medicinal cannabis - the first of its kind in the Channel Islands.




Economic development minister Lyndon Farnham hailed the move as the “birth of a new economic sector” for the island.




Senator Farnham said: “It will have an important economic impact, driving high-value economic diversification, creating jobs, encouraging inward investment and generating tax new revenues to support economic recovery.




“I see the Island’s growing medicinal cannabis sector as the ideal base for companies across the world, looking to expand into the European market.




“Jersey is perfectly placed to be part of a new industry that is about the provision of medicine, innovative cutting-edge science, high-value agriculture, the creation of intellectual property and global regulation,” he told the Jersey Evening Post.




Northern Leaf was awarded a licence to grow cannabis for medicinal use in Jersey earlier this year. It became only the second company to be granted a UK licence for commercial marijuana cultivation after GW Pharmaceuticals, which was first granted its permit in 1998.




CBD, a non-psychoactive element in cannabis, is sold on UK high streets.




Meanwhile, in Guernsey, ministers issued clarification on potential Proceeds of Criminal Acts (POCA) conflicts, designed to make it easier for people and businesses looking to invest in medicinal cannabis production.




If a UK-based person or company invested in a medicinal cannabis firm which also had a recreational cannabis arm to its business - such as in the USA or Canada where both are legal - they could face a prison term or heavy fine as any dividends could be classed a proceeds of crime, as recreational cannabis remains illegal in the UK.




But under new guidance in Guernsey, firms can invest in recreational cannabis if it is lawful in the country of origin.




Robert Jappie, a partner at Ince Gordon Dadds, said: “The Crown Dependencies are taking the lead in creating favourable regulatory environments for cannabis business to operate in.




“By providing detailed guidance on compliance requirements, they have become increasingly desirable jurisdictions for cannabis companies. The licensing regimes are well structured, and the regulators are supportive.”




Meanwhile, on the mainland, the UK remains a big player in the global market, exporting more medicinal cannabis than anywhere else in the world.




However, new entrants claim that the Home Office, which signs off on cultivation licences, is reluctant to help develop an emerging market. GW Pharmaceuticals and its suppliers retain a tight grip on the market, as it is one of the only firms allowed to grow cannabis strong enough for medical use.




A Home Office spokesperson said: “Companies wishing to cultivate cannabis require Home Office Controlled Drug licenses to lawfully undertake these activities.




"The Home Office Drugs and Firearms Licensing Unit operate a robust but proportionate licensing regime which permits cannabis cultivation for lawful purposes. The licensing regime exists to protect the public by enabling safe and lawful access to drug materials, whilst preventing diversion of drugs or their unlawful or unsafe use.”




Cannabis is legal in some US states and products containing CBD - items derived from cannabis but without the THC - are sold across the UK.




Ant Lehane, head of communications at Volteface, an advocacy organisation which seeks to reduce the harm drugs pose to individuals and society, said: “Legal sovereignty post-Brexit simplifies many of these previously complex issues, such as policy related to hemp and the extraction of CBD - Volteface will be providing the solutions to these issues in our upcoming report Pleasant Lands.




“The fact that Novel Foods legislation kicks in later this month, legal clarity primes the UK to take a march on the EU and make the UK the European hub for cultivation, extraction, investment and export.”




Medicinal cannabis is becoming an increasingly attractive market for businesses across the world. As more research is carried out into how medicinal cannabis could help treat multiple conditions, from everything from cancer and Crohn’s disease, to epilepsy and glaucoma, venture capital firms are increasingly attracted by the high growth potential in the market.




Worldwide, the global medicinal cannabis market size was valued at £5.64 ($7.8bn) in 2020. The IMARC Group, a leading management strategy group, estimate the market is expected to grow by 15.3% from 2021 to 2026.




But the UK could have a fight on their hands. The head-start Britain's crown dependencies have got over the UK, coupled with the added benefits of 0% corporation tax, could prove too enticing to pass up on.




The pot power list — the celebrities investing in cannabis



Mike Tyson has his own premium strain. David Beckham is an investor. Even Martha Stewart has jumped on the cannabis rush with a line of CBD dog treats. But it’s not just celebrities enjoying the riches of legal marijuana. What was once considered a blight on society is now touted as both a panacea and a way to get rich quick for pharmacologists, investors and even lawyers. Here is a who’s who of the biggest players in the business.






David Beckham to Jay-Z, the green rush gang


Snoop Dogg; Martha Stewart; David Beckham; Jay-Z; Sean Parker; Miley Cyrus and her father, Billy Ray; Seth Rogen




Legal cannabis products sold on the high street are facing a crackdown amid concerns they could create a 'high' for users



There is unease about levels of psychoactive compound THC in CBD products


Ministers worried sale of CBD gives impression of softening stance on cannabis


People claim CBD alleviates ailments from aches to anxiety but evidence scant




Cannabis products sold on the high street are to face tighter restrictions amid concerns about the levels of chemicals they contain that create a ‘high’ for users.




The popularity of products containing the cannabis extract cannabidiol – or CBD – has exploded, with stores such as Boots and Holland & Barrett selling them.




But there is unease about their varying levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) – the psychoactive compound that gives a ‘high’.




Ministers are also worried the widespread sale of CBD products is giving the misleading impression that the Government is softening its approach towards the Class B drug




Advocates claim CBD alleviates ailments from aches to anxiety, although hard evidence is scant




Ministers are also worried the widespread sale of CBD products is giving the misleading impression that the Government is softening its approach towards the Class B drug.




Policing Minister Kit Malthouse wants to ensure high street CBD products contain no more than ‘an unavoidable trace level’ of THC and other psychoactive compounds, collectively termed ‘controlled cannabinoids’.




Advocates claim CBD alleviates ailments from aches to anxiety, although hard evidence is scant.




Writing to scientists on the Government’s Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD), Mr Malthouse said: ‘The Government is minded to amend the regulations to permit CBD products that contain no more than a defined trace percentage of certain controlled cannabinoids.’




He has asked the ACMD to help set a legal cap on the percentage of THC and other controlled cannabinoids in CBD products.




At the moment, they can contain up to 1mg of controlled cannabinoids per pack regardless of pack size.




A Government source said: ‘The Minister wants a level playing field so there is no confusion about what is and isn’t legal.




CBD BRANDS GET REVENUE BOOST WITH HEMP PRE-ROLLS



Custom Cones USA CBD Boost with Hemp Pre-Rolls CBD Today




Hemp farmers are making money from nose to tail with their products thanks to a strong market for CBD pre-rolls. According to Grandview Research, the global CBD market was valued at US $4.6 billion in 2018 and is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 22.2 percent from 2019 to 2025.




Harrison Bard, head of business development at Custom Cones USA, a pre-roll supplies company serving the industry, said hemp/CBD farmers have been a source of growth for the company as farmers get equipped to venture into the pre-roll market.




According to a 2020 study of the pre-rolled cannabis industry undertaken by Custom Cones USA, nearly 30 percent of pre-roll cannabis businesses surveyed were hemp/CBD manufacturers, taking their CBD flower and trim product and rolling it up into CBD-rich pre-rolled joints.




“As hemp farms dip into CBD pre-rolls and cigarettes, we have found there is a steep learning curve when you go from just growing the hemp to processing it into another product,” Bard said. “We try our best to be an education resource for our customers.”




GEARING UP FOR VOLUME


If a farm is just getting into the pre-roll space, there are a couple of assumptions that can be made about their production machinery needs. They likely will need a grinder to shred their hemp product into a fine consistency, and they likely will need a filling machine to fill their cones or tubes with the ground hemp product.




Bard said Custom Cones USA carries several grinders but specializes in machines with high torque and low revolutions per minute that push the product through variable screen sizes to achieve the uniform grind.




“A lot of grinders use high RPMs that create heat, which tends to pulverize the hemp product to dust, losing some of its primary flavor,” Bard said.




After grinding, pre-roll professionals put the product through a sifter machine to remove any stems or foreign material from the mix.




As for filling machines, Custom Cones USA is a big proponent of the King Kone because it works with the most sizes and packs pre-rolled cones perfectly with a strong up-and-down bouncing action, driven by a motor.




“The King Kone is effective and versatile,” Bard said. “Customers love that it can do three of the main cone sizes right out of the box with no extra attachments.”




Compared to other industrial cone-filling machines, the King Kone has size-specific trays for half-gram, 0.7-gram, and full-gram pre-rolls included with the base pre-roll machine. However, filling cigarette-style tubes requires a totally different machine setup.




STANDING OUT IN A CROWDED MARKET


Although the CBD space still has a lot of growth on the horizon, the market already is becoming crowded. Google “CBD pre-rolls” or “CBD cigarettes,” and you will see a lot of brands competing for attention. Your local gas station may even carry 2-3 CBD pre-roll options already, so it is important to ensure your brand and products stand out.




New brands or farms should look at their local market and see how much competition they have. Check smoke shops and gas stations to see how competitive local stores will be to get into. Once you’ve gathered some market data, start thinking about branding and packaging.




For packaging, Bard said Custom Cones USA has one of the widest selections of joint tubes, pre-roll tins, and other types of luxury and child-resistant multipack packaging in the industry.




“We have done some really cool custom packages,” he said. “If they can think it up, then we can create it.”




Bard said this ability to customize packaging is getting more and more important as CBD smokes increase in popularity and the market becomes more crowded.




It’s not just that there are a lot of players getting into the CBD pre-rolls market, but there are some big players coming on the scene as well. San Francisco-based cannabis tastemaker SHERBINSKIS recently began producing CBD smokes. Also, in 2019, internationally acclaimed pop star Post Malone launched his own CBD pre-roll brand called Shaboink.




“Brands have to have a thoughtful approach to how they are competing in their local market,” Bard said.




FUTURE OF THE INDUSTRY


If you are a hemp grower, brand, or any business thinking about getting into the CBD pre-roll space, there are a ton of factors and variables to consider. For example, you can choose between offering your CBD pre-roll in two main forms: a cone or a tube.




The pre-rolled cone and pre-rolled tube require different machines to produce. Different filter and paper types are available, each offering a totally different smoking experience.




Regardless whether you choose cone or tube format, automation is coming. There are many automated machines coming to help farmers produce both pre-rolled cones and cigarette-style CBD pre-rolls.




Seeding the future of British Hemp



CREATING A THRIVING DOMESTIC HEMP INDUSTRY




Whole Plant Extract CBD is under serious threat and we need to move fast to save this industry.




The ACI/CMC’s, ‘Health Guidance Levels for THC in CBD Products: Safety Assessment & Regulatory Recommendations’. report has recently been published severely crippling the industry, while the rest of the world steams ahead:




The ACI/CMC are proposing a 0.03% product limit and to put it under a Schedule 5 that would be a disaster for our burgeoning domestic UK hemp industry.




The Novel Foods has also come into effect and things are in confusion over what is allowed and what is not.




A 0.03% product limit would be a disaster for the burgeoning domestic UK hemp industry.




With the forecasted increase in temperatures and droughts, the THC level is only going to naturally rise in all cannabis varieties over time. Many of the 0.2% European approved varieties currently grown in the UK often end up around 0.35% THC, and even higher by the end of flowering season. Farmers in America working with a 0.3% limit, have similar issues keeping the plants below the limit.




This Hemp Huddle will look at the fate of CBD in the UK and EU from a grass roots, domestic perspective, and let you know what what is happening to our CBD industry, and the fate of CBD if our perspective is not a part of the regulatory discussions.




Our Mission


The UK has a unique opportunity to establish a leading position within one of the most important and rapidly growing agricultural and industrial markets that has emerged for decades.




The British Hemp Alliance (BHA), was formed in 2019 to lobby for change and remove the barriers to growth that are preventing the UK hemp industry from thriving. It is comprised of NGO’s, farmers, businesses, environmental organisations and individuals who want to support progressive changes in hemp legislation.




We believe 3 things have to happen, in order for the UK hemp industry to fulfil its potential and hemp be recognised as an essential agricultural and environmentally friendly crop:




ALL UK HEMP LICENCES TO BE ADMINISTERED BY DEFRA


At present the hemp license still remains within the remit of the drugs and firearms department of the Home Office, and the process of getting the license is prohibitive. The restrictions are deterring traditional farmers who see hemp as an alternative to ‘traditional’ crops, and with many more applications.





UTILISATION OF THE WHOLE HEMP PLANT, INCLUDING LEAF & FLOWER


Farmers are unable to harvest, extract, transport or process the leaf or the flower; it has to be destroyed on site. The flowers are the most profitable parts of the plant that contain the highest concentration of CBD (cannabidiol). At present all CBD extracts used in the UK are imported from Europe, China, Canada and U.S.A, where it is legal to harvest the hemp flower.




1% PERMITTED LEVELS OF THC HEMP


The EU law allowance of THC in a hemp plant is 0.2% THC. However, in Australia, Ecuador, Uruguay and Switzerland, the plant can contain up to 1% THC. A healthy dose of THC means a healthier plant. 1% THC has no psychoactive effect at this dose; however, the plant is healthier and can produce better crops and flowers.





The Importance of Hemp for the UK


We believe an unrestricted and thriving hemp industry delivers several key goals in the UK, relevant to both agricultural and environmental policies. It can be used for a range of environmentally friendly and carbon negative products, while actively contributing to mitigating climate change. A thriving domestic hemp industry can kickstart a new green industrial revolution, boost local economies, and help to seed a brighter future in a post-Brexit landscape.




HEMP MANUFACTURING IN THE UK


Since the passing of the US Hemp Farm Bill in 2018, we are beginning to see a huge resurgence in hemp manufacturing. If we don’t act soon, we could miss this vital opportunity to be part of the worldwide hemp renaissance.





NEW MARKET OPPORTUNITIES


A domestic Industrial hemp industry can provide many economic benefits for the UK, as well as British farmers, by fuelling technological, manufacturing, and design innovations that are essential to create new market opportunities and boost the local, bio and circular economies.




PRESENT HEMP SITUATION IN THE U.K.


The UK is a world leader in research and design, but hemp has barely featured, which is a another missed opportunity. Due to the removal of the processing subsidy as part of the EU CAP in 2013, and the above political barriers to growth, hemp has received little to no industrial interest or funding.




British invasion: Michelin-starred chef enters CBD-infused beverage space with elevated flavor profiles




The CBD beverages space is not for the faint-hearted given the regulatory minefield brands have to navigate, but Isca is hoping to bring a more culinary twist to the nascent category with the assistance of British Michelin-starred Chef Michael Caines.




Malta Will Allow People To Grow Up To Four Cannabis Plants In Major Weed Reform



People in Malta will be allowed to grow up to four cannabis plants, Prime Minister Robert Abela has proposed as part of a White Paper to reform the country’s weed laws.




Cannabis plants grown at home can only be cultivated in a space that isn’t visible to the public and can only be used by the people living in that residence.




One can grow up to four plants for their exclusive use, and any homegrown cannot be sold to third parties.




Cannabis users found in possession of up to 7g of weed will no longer be arrested or prosecuted, while those found in possession of between 7 and 28g won’t be subject to court proceedings but will be subject to proceedings in front of a tribunal, where they can be fined between €50 and €100.




People will be able to buy cannabis and seeds from a legal source. Abela said he’s keeping his options open in this regard and will listen to public consultation in this regard, paving the way to the potential introduction of cannabis social clubs.




In another major reform, people will be able to expunge cannabis possession-related crimes from their criminal records.




Meanwhile, a new government authority will be set up to oversee matters related to cannabis for personal use, and it will be tasked with commissioning studies and proposing guidelines.




“We’re a government that listens, understands, and takes decisions,” Abela said. “In recent months I was clear that it’s unacceptable for people caught smoking a joint to end up arrested, interrogated and prosecuted.”




“We already made steps forward in 2015 but reality showed us it wasn’t enough. It saddens me that some people are still being persecuted over joints, while the black market keeps finding fertile ground to operate in.”




“These proposals have their root in our electoral manifesto. Debate on this topic has been going on for a while and we now have concrete proposals to strengthen the legal framework for responsible use of cannabis.”




“Behind each proposal is a person who could have been stigmatised for smoking a joint, who ended up humiliated with their names broadcast to the country.”






Labour MP and former parliamentary secretary Rosianne Cutajar, who spearheaded this reform, said the proposals are the result of a year of work and consultation, as well as determination to create a fairer system.




“I’m proud with the proposals, because I know they come from a sense of justice, progress and responsibility,” she said while urging the public to submit their feedback over the next six weeks.




NYPD memo tells cops the smell of marijuana alone is no longer probable cause of a crime justifying vehicle search after state votes to legalize drug



NYPD on Wednesday circulated internal memo to all of its commands, explaining new marijuana laws




Gov Andrew Cuomo on Wednesday signed a bill into law legalizing recreational use of marijuana




New Yorkers aged 21 and over can now legally possess up to three ounces of marijuana outside of the home




Memo states that smell of marijuana alone no longer establishes probable cause of a crime to search a vehicle




Smoking marijuana while driving is still illegal, as is operating a vehicle while high




Police officers in New York City are no longer allowed to search a vehicle simply because there is a smell of marijuana coming from it, now that the state has legalized the recreational use of the drug.




The NYPD on Wednesday circulated a memo to all of its commands, explaining the new laws governing the possession, sale and use of marijuana, and laying out 'the sweeping changes to the department's enforcement of marihuana'.




The memo was sent after Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill legalizing recreational marijuana into law, making New York the 16th state in the US to take that step.




After the legalization of recreational marijuana in New York, police can no longer search a vehicle simply because there is a smell of marijuana coming from it.






People aged 21 and over can legally possess up to 3 ounces of pot outside of the home, and also grow up to three mature cannabis plants in their home




Adults also can legally have up to 5lbs pounds of marijuana in their home as well as grow up to three mature and three immature cannabis plants in their home.




'Effective immediately, the smell of marihuanaalone no longer establishes probable cause of a crime to search a vehicle,' the police memo states. 'This change applies to both burnt and unburnt marijuana.'




Smoking marijuana while driving is still illegal, as is operating a vehicle while high.




If an officer smells burnt marijuana from a car, it can be considered probable cause to search the passenger compartment, but not the trunk.




Police can only search the trunk if they develop 'separate probable cause' to believe there is evidence of a crime inside.




Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill legalizing recreational marijuana into law Wednesday




Sales of recreational-use marijuana won't become legal for an estimated 18 months pending state regulations




The memo notes that under the new law, anyone over the age of 21 is allowed to smoke marijuana 'almost anywhere that cigarette smoking is allowed including on sidewalks, on front stoops and other public places. As a result, smoking marihuana in any of these locations is not a basis for an approach, stop, summons, arrest or search.'




According to the revised guidelines, street sales of marijuana are still against the law, but police witnessing a 'hand-to-hand' exchange of 3oz or less of marijuana cannot make an arrest or issue a summons, unless they see money changing hands.




Police officers also have been made aware that people on parole are now allowed to use marijuana, unless the terms of their parole specifically prohibit it.




Anyone previously convicted of possessing marijuana under the new legal limit will automatically be eligible to resentencing. The bill will also lead to reduced penalties for possession and sale.




'This is a historic day in New York – one that rights the wrongs of the past by putting an end to harsh prison sentences, embraces an industry that will grow the Empire State's economy, and prioritizes marginalized communities so those that have suffered the most will be the first to reap the benefits,' Cuomo said in a statement.




Why Does Social Media Still Ban Cannabis?



While it may seem tempting to blast sales promotions and your new products online, stop. You can get red flagged or even have your account deactivated.


Anyone who handles the marketing or social media side for a cannabis business can tell you that social media is a huge pain in the @$$.




With ever-changing regulations and “Community Guidelines”, hemp and cannabis companies struggle with marketing. Advertising online is like walking on eggshells, you just never know when you’re going to get a shadow ban, which is when TikTok, Instagram, or Facebook suddenly hides your posts or restricts them from followers which you worked so hard to get organically.




Once your brand has been shadow banned, this leads to a significantly reduced interaction and reach. Worst of all, companies aren’t warned or given any formal notifications when they are shadow banned. In some cases, posts can even be deleted if the social media giants suddenly decide that they go against community guidelines.






And even worst of all, you can have your account deleted permanently if all these happen multiple times. Months, years even, of hard work online can all be wiped out without you knowing it.




But all of these risks haven’t stopped hemp and cannabis businesses from using these platforms to find their new customers, so even if Facebook and other social media giants don’t allow ads for cannabis products, they do hacks to work around the bans.




Here’s what you need to know about the big 3 platforms to work around the bans:




Facebook: There is a differentiation between prohibited and restricted content, but for cannabis businesses, Facebook strictly prohibits the promotion of any drug or related products even if it’s a legal or recreational drug. For this reason, text and images can’t be included in ads. Federal restrictions also mean that cannabis companies can’t run ads including in states where the drug is legal. When you fail to comply with the advertising guidelines on Facebook, your ads will not only get shut down but you can face the risk of your account getting deleted.




Twitter: Twitter states that “illegal drugs, recreational and herbal drugs, accessories associated with drug use, drug dispensaries, and depictions of hard drug use” are prohibited in its advertising policies under the Drugs and Drug Paraphernalia section.




Instagram: Since Facebook acquired Instagram in 2012, they apply the same kind of restrictive advertising policies which say, in many words, that there is no kind of advertising allowed for cannabis companies on the platform.




So what can be done to work around these?




Since cannabis businesses can’t advertise on social media, they have to resort to reaching their audiences organically the hard way – by creating amazing content. However, that has its own caveat: social media platforms limit the organic reach of cannabis posts BUT that doesn’t mean that you can’t reach a large audience; you just have to be clever in your strategy and always stay up to date with the changing restrictions.




Here’s what you can do:




Post educational content on cannabis: This type of content is almost guaranteed to be a sure hit because it gives value to your followers by educating them on topics that they care about. For example, cannabis brands can educate their customers by sharing informative and helpful articles about medicinal uses of the plant or how to use their product.




If your brand is just starting out online, it might take a few posts to see which topics strike a chord with your followers. After a while you can then identify which topics will get a good response from your audience. Just remember not to post sales promotions with educational content because this can cause your post to be removed or get red flagged; use other channels for sales promotions.




hers all you need to know about tiktok the next big social media app




Diversify your channels: Don’t put all your eggs in one basket applies to cannabis marketing too. You’ll see greater success if you work with more platforms as long as you are strategic about your platforms to ensure that all posts align well with your brand mission. Additionally, study the psychographic and demographic profile of your target audience to determine which platforms you should be using. For example, industry news and corporate information on your brand are best shared on LinkedIn while educational posts can be shared on Facebook.




If you aren’t sure about which platforms will provide you the best engagement and results, then do some testing.




Videos: Video is one of the most engaging types of content on social media, just be sure that you are using some subtitles for people who watch videos with the sound off.




Brand ambassadors/Influencers: Partnering up with brand ambassadors or influencers is a popular and efficient way to reach new audiences. It’s a great way to organically grow your reach to the larger audiences of influential people.




Last but not least, if you have spare money to burn and don’t want to be bothered with the nitty gritty, you can always outsource your work to marketing agencies that are well-versed in the cannabis space.




While it may seem tempting to blast sales promotions and your new products online, stop. You can get red flagged or even have your account deactivated. Remember that your followers want to patronize accounts that give them valuable content because truly valuable content stands out in a sea of many other cannabis brands that are already trying to do the same thing as you are.




People don’t want to be pitched to all the time. Don’t post images of the cannabis plant heavily since this won’t appeal to everyone (such as seniors who are looking for information) and this can also get your page red flagged.




Follow the best practices and eventually you’ll get the hang of what you should and shouldn’t do on social media to grow your business. Social media rules may never change, so it requires adaptability in part of businesses who want to succeed on their platform.


#####


Is CBD flower legal in the UK?

Are CBD flowers legal in the UK?



The answer is no.




CBD flowers are not legal in the UK.




If you wish to be able to buy and possess CBD flowers of any form of cannabis in the UK, you will need to do so via a prescription.


CBD flowers legal?



CBD flowers are not legal in the UK.




They are illegal as stated the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.




“cannabis” (except in the expression “cannabis resin”) means any plant of the genus Cannabis or any part of any such plant (by whatever name designated) except that it does not include cannabis resin or any of the following products after separation from the rest of the plant, namely—



(a) mature stalk of any such plant,



(b) fibre produced from mature stalk of any such plant,



(c) seed of any such plant,



“cannabis resin” means the separated resin, whether crude or purified, obtained from any plant of the genus Cannabis,




As the text clearly shows, there is no exemption or definition of cannabis by its cannabinoid content, therefore cannabis is illegal, whether it is high in THC or high in CBD.


Rise in popularity of CBD Flowers in the United Kingdom



The last few years have seen products such as CBD Hash, CBD Pollen and CBD Edibles enter the public eye with a bang.




There is now a range of CBD Flowers products being sold in high street stores and online.




Thanks to this rise in popularity, many more people are educating themselves about the health benefits of CBD Flower..




This is fueled by countless medical studies and anecdotal reports from users.




People are turning to CBD Flower to help with anxiety, stress, fitness and many other aspects of their lives.




CBD containing products such as oils are currently legal in the UK.




They are considered exempt from the law thanks to three reasons as defined in the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001.




The MDR states that a CBD product will be exempt from being illegal where it satisfies all three elements of the exempt product definition:




1) it is not designed for the administration of the controlled substance, ie THC




2) any THC elements of the product are packaged in such a way that it cannot be recovered by readily applicable means, or at a level which would constitute a risk to health;




3) it contains no more than one milligram per component part of the product.




Because products like CBD oils meet all of these criteria, they are exempt. But this exemption does not apply to CBD flowers.




What are CBD flowers or buds?



Known as CBD Flower, CBD Hash, CBD Buds and CBD Weed, many retailers, both online and on the high street, have begun selling flowers of the hemp plant that are high in CBD content (around 13-15%) and low in THC (usually less than 1%).




These products look a lot like ‘normal’ THC rich cannabis.




Thanks to selective breeding, growers have been able to take cannabis strains that are low in THC and high in CBD and other cannabinoids, crossing them to create CBD dominant strains.




These flowers have become popular in states in the US and Canada where cannabis is legal, and have also gained popularity in European countries where exemptions have been made for cannabis and hemp which is low in THC.




In these countries, cannabis users are turning to CBD flowers as a way of consuming cannabis without getting high.




Why is there confusion about CBD flowers in the UK?



Sellers and consumers often claim the that CBD flower and CBD bud is legal based on the fact that it has been sourced from ‘EU approved varieties’ and contains ‘less than 0.2% THC’, citing the exemption example given above.




Further confusion arises from Home Office guidance, which states that CBD rich hemp can be legally grown in the UK, providing it is from approved seeds and the end product contains less than 0.2% THC.




However, to grow this hemp, farmers must first obtain a hemp cultivation licence, and even then can only keep the seeds and fibres of the plant.




All other parts of the plant, including the buds and flowers, must be destroyed.




So even CBD flowers grown with a Home Office licence in the UK with less than 0.2% THC would still be considered illegal, and must not be sold online or in retail stores.




To clarify the matter, a prominent cannabis campaigner, Peter Reynolds, wrote to the Home Office, asking them to confirm the law.




This was the response:




“Thank you for your email.




I can confirm that the leaves and flowers of the genus Cannabis are controlled and defined as cannabis as outlined in Section 37(1) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971




“cannabis” (except in the expression “cannabis resin”) means any plant of the genus cannabis or any part of any such plant (by whatever name designated) except that it does not include cannabis resin or any of the following products after separation from the rest of the plant, namely—



(a)mature stalk of any such plant,



(b)fibre produced from mature stalk of any such plant, and



(c)seed of any such plant;”.




Once the separation of the stalk and seeds from the plant has occurred it will not be defined as cannabis.




This also extends to the fibre produced from the stalk.




Regards




Jill Frankham



Senior Compliance Officer



Drugs & Firearms Licensing Unit”




Why are CBD flowers still on sale in the UK if they are illegal?



Despite all of the above, many stores online and offline continue to flout the law




Unfortunately, ignorance is not considered a defence when it comes to criminal matters.




In 2020 a number of CBD shops across the country were raided for selling CBD flowers.




In one case, police involved in the operation were clear, stating that they believed the shops had been attempting to exploit a “loophole” that allows certain stores to sell cannabis containing up to 0.2% THC, though this in fact only applies to licensed pharmacies selling to people with a specific prescription.




“Unless you are a specifically licensed pharmacy, you cannot legally sell or supply cannabis or THC products – no matter what percentage content it has,” Police Constable Ross Bennett who investigated the case said.




How can I buy CBD flowers legally in the UK?


Until the law is updated to take into account the difference between CBD flowers and high THC cannabis, there is no legal way to buy CBD flowers online or in-store in the UK




The only legal way to possess cannabis is by obtaining a prescription.




Since November 2018, it has been possible for cannabis to be prescribed for medical purposes only.




It is difficult to obtain a medical cannabis prescription on the NHS, however, there are a number of private cannabis clinics that will issue prescriptions for genuine cases.




Costs are prohibitive, but as more clinics open the cost for consultations and legally available products comes down.




If you wish to be able to buy and possess CBD flowers of any form of cannabis in the UK, you will need to do so via a prescription.




It is also not a defence to tell officers that you thought your cannabis was legal because you bought it from a CBD shop – it is a class B drug and you will be dealt with accordingly.


are cbd flowers legal uk



is cbd flower legal UK 2021


Are CBD Flowers Legal in the UK?






Consumer cannabidiol (CBD) products



call for evidence




Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) call for evidence on cannabinoids in CBD products.


The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) has been commissioned to provide impartial and independent scientific advice on the acceptable levels of constituent cannabinoids in cannabidiol (CBD) products (in other words, other than CBD itself) marketed as consumer products.


The commission does not extend to prescribed products/medicines. The ACMD invites all sections of society to provide written evidence with regards to this commission.


We are specifically seeking evidence on the following questions. Your written submission can provide responses to some or all of the questions:


The commission refers to the cannabinoids Δ9-THC, CBN and THCV. Are there any further phytocannabinoids which should be considered? If so, which cannabinoids and please provide evidence.


At what dose would each of these cannabinoids cause a psychoactive effect in humans? Are there any potential harmful effects at these doses?


What are the conditions that precursors of cannabinoids such as Δ9-THCA-A might be transformed into controlled cannabinoids?


What is the combined level of the psychoactive cannabinoids that would not produce a psychoactive effect (in other words maximum combined dose of active ingredients) given the standard use of consumer CBD products?


Are you aware of any evidence of CBD products causing adverse reactions or harms which might be attributable to cannabinoid impurities? If so, please attach such evidence.


For producers of CBD-containing products for supply to consumers, what certification of quality of CBD extracts from raw materials do you require or expect?


For which controlled phytocannabinoids are there reference standards available or likely to become available in the near future for their use in testing?


Please note that owing to the specific focus of this ministerial commission, the ACMD will only consider information relevant to these questions. Additional information will not be considered.




CBD and CBD-based products are taking the UK by storm. With cannabis remaining (mostly) illegal in the UK, other means of marijuana are slowly making their way into our lives and onto our shelves. A variety of CBD products such as: CBD hemp gummies, CBD oils, CBD hemp pain relief cream and CBD flowers, are becoming more and more mainstream in the UK and around the world. But whilst some are legal, others are not. Today we’re going to be delving into the question of: are CBC flowers legal in the UK? As usual with UK drug laws, the answer is somewhat confusing, but we’ve fortunately done all of the research you need to know in order to understand the drug laws around CBD flowers. We’ll also throw in some information on how to safely purchase CBD flowers too. For good measure. As always, strap yourself in. Let’s go.



What is CBD and THC?


First things first, let’s define the terms CBD and THC because they are going to be coming up a lot in our discussion of CBD flowers.


THC


THC has psychoactive effects that produce the ‘high’ feeling people experience when inhaling weed; feelings of euphoria and joy. The higher the THC percentage, the more intense that high is. THC is illegal in the UK if it’s above 0.2% within the product.


CBD


Alternatively, CBD does not have psychoactive effects. If anything, it has calming tendencies. CBD is used mostly in wellness products, which focus on healing, anti-inflammation and helping with anxiety and sleep deprivation.



What are CBD Flowers?


So, what are CBD flowers? Some call them CBD buds, CBD hash, CBD weed, but either way, CBD flowers are buds from the marijuana plant that are high in CBD and low in THC. They look exactly the same as usual marijuana, but what’s inside has been altered by the creators. THC and CBD may be the most prominent cannabinoids with cannabis, but they are still very different. The percentage of each within a bud will lead to extremely different feelings. CBD flowers usually contain around 15% CBD and 0.2% THC.


CBD flowers are for those who prefer high CBD, low THC products. Usually this is for medicinal purposes or simply due to preference.


Benefits of CBD


What are the benefits of CBD?


Well, despite the research into CBD being slightly controversial, here is a list of the main health benefits of CBD.


Many people use CBD everyday to help both physical and mental illnesses.


CBD has been seen to help with:


Anxiety


Depression


Stress


PTSD


Sleep Deprivation


Bone Growth


Inflammation


Pain


Muscle Spasming


Nausea


Blood Sugar Levels



Are CBD Flowers Legal in the UK?


One of the biggest questions on any weed-lovers lips is:


Is weed legal in the UK?


The truth is, UK drug laws on marijuana are somewhat inconsistent. Whilst CBD oils, CBD hemp gummies and CBD pain relief cream are legal to purchase within the UK, for some reason, CBD flowers are not.


The Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 clearly states that cannabis is illegal. And they define cannabis as this:


“cannabis” (except in the expression “cannabis resin”) means any plant of the genus Cannabis or any part of any such plant (by whatever name designated) except that it does not include cannabis resin or any of the following products after separation from the rest of the plant, namely—


(a) mature stalk of any such plant,


(b) fibre produced from mature stalk of any such plant, and


(c) seed of any such plant;]


“cannabis resin” means the separated resin, whether crude or purified, obtained from any plant of the genus Cannabis;


This was how it was in the UK until CBD products and CBD health benefits became more mainstream.


Then came along the Misuse of Drugs Regulations Act 2001.


The Act stated that CBD products would be legal if they satisfied all three steps towards legalization:


1) it is not designed for the administration of the controlled substance, ie THC


2) any THC elements of the product are packaged in such a way that it cannot be recovered by readily applicable means, or at a level which would constitute a risk to health;


3) it contains no more than one milligram per component part of the product.


CBD flowers not only satisfy these steps, but also satisfy European law, which states that if a product has THC levels of 0.2% then they are deemed legal. However, according to UK law, CBD flowers are not legal. The opinion of the government is that European laws are not the same as UK laws. This is where the confusion starts. Especially as the UK also states that certain seeds are legal to grow if they have less than 0.2% THC. However, in order to do this, you would need a hemp cultivation licence. It gets even weirder, because even if you had a licence, it would still be illegal to keep any of the buds after growing them. The confusion around CBD flowers is yet another example of the UK’s inconsistent and essentially weird drug regulations.



Where can I Buy CBD Flowers?


Despite CBD flowers being technically illegal, they are still all over the internet for easy purchase. In fact, very rarely do the websites even inform customers that CBD flowers are illegal in the UK. It is quite common that customers buy CBD flowers without realising they are illegal, and will most likely use them without even being caught.


However, if that’s a risk you aren’t willing to take, then why not try other CBD-based products. CBD hemp gummies, for example, are legal and are easy to buy. There are lots of benefits of CBD gummies, they have much the same effects as CBD flowers. Also, for physical ailments, why not try CBD hemp pain relief cream.


However, if you are interested in purchasing CBD flowers off the internet regardless then it’s important to know a few helpful things. Dry herb vaporizers are legal to buy and they are a way to inhale your dry herb without needing tobacco or needing to burn anything. A dry herb vaporizer creates vapour at a lower temperature, rather than smoke at a higher temperature, which makes it a much healthier option to smoking. It might just be the perfect way to inhale your CBD flowers.


In addition, if you’re using CBD flowers for medicinal purposes, why not apply for a Cancard. The Cancard is a cannabis allowance card which can be applied for if your doctor has prescribed you medicinal marijuana. Since 2018, medicinal marijuana has been legal, but very expensive to get a hold of. Therefore, if you have a Cancard, you can avoid being prosecuted for using marijuana medicinally. What is the cancard? Find out here.



When will CBD Flowers be Legal in the UK?


Now you have all the information you need on CBD flowers, the only question left to answer is: when will they be legal in the UK? With the Cancard being released in 2020, and medicinal marijuana being legalized (sort of) in 2018, it seems that the UK are slowly moving towards a more accepting stance on marijuana. Whilst legalizing CBD flowers, and allowing people to actually smoke bud around the UK, might be a precedent that the government are not yet ready for, it’s surely only a matter of time.


We hope you enjoyed the article, and as always, found it educational. Until next time.



Summary


Article NameAre CBD Flowers Legal in the UK?


DescriptionToday we’re going to be delving into the question of: are CBC flowers legal in the UK? As usual with UK drug laws, the answer is somewhat confusing, but we’ve fortunately done all of the research you need to know in order to understand the drug laws around CBD flowers. We’ll also throw in some information on how to safely purchase CBD flowers too. For good measure. As always, strap yourself in. Let’s go.








CBD Flowers: What are they, Are they Legal In the UK


Recent reports from the verdict indicate that the global cannabidiol (CBD) market is estimated to grow by 700%. This shows the rise in popularity of CBD products in the UK.


Although CBD-based products have been commercially available in the UK for some time, they appear to be gaining greater mainstream use and acceptance, as big-name companies invest increasing amounts of money in developing CBD-based products.


What about CBD Flower / Buds?


Despite its increasing popularity of CBD products, one of the lesser-known CBD goods available to buy online is CBD flowers.


So what are they? What are they used for? And are they legal in the UK? Let’s take a closer look.


Table of Contents


What about CBD Flower / Buds?


What is CBD?


What is CBD Flower?


Are CBD Flowers Legal in the UK?


So, if CBD flowers are illegal, why are they so readily available to buy online?


The Conclusion?


What is CBD?


CBD, or Cannabidiol, is one of over a hundred cannabinoid compounds found in the Cannabis Sativa, or Hemp, plant.


CBD is most commonly extracted from the flowers, stalks and leaves of the hemp plant and added to a carrier oil, such as hemp seed oil, to create CBD oil – a food supplement that CBD can use to support wellbeing and healthy living.


These hemp plant strains are cultivated for their high CBD levels but have a deficient THC level (Tetrahydrocannabinol).


Unlike THC, CBD is a non-psychoactive substance, which means that users don’t get the “high” that’s often associated with recreational cannabis use.


What is Flower?


A CBD flower is a term used to refer to the flower, or bud, of the Hemp plant.


CBD flowers have grown in popularity in recent years, as the demand for CBD products has increased, with people looking for new and interesting ways to add CBD to their diet.


These flowers are essentially the same part of the plant that recreational cannabis users use. However, because they are from a different strain of the cannabis plant, they do not contain THC levels.


The flowers are sold by online retailers for users to smoke or create CBD edibles in the same way they would with recreational cannabis.


Are CBD Flowers Legal in the UK?


In short, No CBD Flower is not legal in the UK. The UK law states that as it is classed as part of the cannabis plant, it falls under the Misuse of Drugs Act of 1971, currently in effect as a controlled drug.


The Medicpro state that CBD flowers: The sale of ‘CBD Flowers’ and buds is prohibited even if THC is below 0.2% and from EU approved origin.


While it’s perfectly legal to buy CBD oil and other CBD products on the high street or online because you’re buying a finished retail product, the issue with CBD flower/bud arises because there are laws and restrictions on the cultivation of the Hemp plant.


Cultivation requires a license in the UK and means that only the fibre and seeds can be processed for commercial use, with the rest of the plant, including the flowers, to be destroyed.


CBD flowers look and smell identical to those used for recreational cannabis use, so it would be impossible for the UK police or any other law enforcement agency to distinguish between the two.


So, if CBD flowers are illegal, why are they so readily available to buy online?


The short answer is that the government and the organisations in charge of enforcing these laws don’t have the necessary resources to impose the law on those selling the products online or simply haven’t had a chance to catch up with each of the sellers yet.


A small number of vape shops have been closed down temporarily due to selling CBD flower in the UK recently in Plymouth, UK, who were importing CBD flower from Switzerland they claimed it was totally legal in the UK. Still, The Police told them that they were illegal to sell in the UK by the local police.


If you’re the end-user and you’re caught in possession of CBD flowers / CBD Bud, there is still a chance you could face charges under the Misuse of Drugs Act because a CBD flower is from the cannabis plant, so it is considered a Class B drug.


In our belief, it’s simply not worth the risk to buy an illegal product like CBD flowers when there are countless CBD products available that are perfectly legal to buy and possess.


The Conclusion?


CBD flowers might be easy to find and purchase online, but there will always be a risk that doing so could result in prosecution.


While the risk may be small, it seems unnecessary given the sheer number of CBD products that are now available legally both online and on the high street.


If you’re going to buy CBD, make sure it’s from a reputable brand that can provide lab results to verify the compounds present in their products so that you know for certain what the products contain.


There can be much confusing information out there, so if you’re still unsure about CBD, you can contact the UK CBD Oils team for further support.






CBD FLOWERS LEGAL




In 2021 Is CBD Flower Legal in the UK?




There’s been a growing trend of retailers selling CBD flower in the UK over the past several years. You may have even walked into a shop and seen the flower on the counter and thought to yourself “Isn’t this illegal? How are they doing this?”. Which brings us to our big question;




Is CBD Flower Legal in the UK?


Well, your instincts are correct. The short answer is, no, CBD flower is not legal in the UK. While CBD flower does not possess a high enough concentration of the controlled substance THC to get you high, CBD flower is currently illegal to possess or sell in the UK.




We’ve dived deep into this matter, and confirmed its illegality beyond a shadow of a doubt. Despite some thinking it’s a legal grey area, we’ve confirmed our findings with Mackrells Solicitors, one of the top cannabis law firms in the country.




CBD Flower


What is CBD Flower and why do people want it?


Before getting into why this matter is so confusing, and why there is so much misinformation out there, it’s important to understand what exactly we’re talking about.




CBD flower is derived from the hemp plant and looks strikingly similar to its THC-containing counterpart. Unlike “normal” cannabis, CBD flower does not contain THC in any significant amount, and will not get the user high in the same way normal cannabis would.




CBD Flowers: What are they, Are they Legal In the UK


24/03/2021


Recent reports from the verdict indicate that the global cannabidiol (CBD) market is estimated to grow by 700%. This shows the rise in popularity of CBD products in the UK.




Although CBD-based products have been commercially available in the UK for some time, they appear to be gaining greater mainstream use and acceptance, as big-name companies invest increasing amounts of money in developing CBD-based products.




What about CBD Flower / Buds?


Despite its increasing popularity of CBD products, one of the lesser-known CBD goods available to buy online is CBD flowers.




So what are they? What are they used for? And are they legal in the UK? Let’s take a closer look.




Table of Contents


What about CBD Flower / Buds?


What is CBD?


What is CBD Flower?


Are CBD Flowers Legal in the UK?


So, if CBD flowers are illegal, why are they so readily available to buy online?


The Conclusion?


What is CBD?


CBD, or Cannabidiol, is one of over a hundred cannabinoid compound


Typically, normal cannabis strains that are grown to achieve a high will contain 15-30% THC. A flower that is grown for CBD use specifically will contain less than 1% THC, often falling under .2%.




So, if these strains will not get you high, why are people interested in buying them? Well, CBD provides many reported benefits to its users despite its lack of psychoactive components. CBD is seeing a rise in popularity as users report effects like general pain relief, relief from joint pain, reductions in anxiety and depressive symptoms, and assistance in getting a good night’s sleep.




These effects are currently being studied, and the research is not yet conclusive. While many users report these benefits and many initial studies appear to support them, more research is needed to confirm or deny these claims.




Where does the confusion regarding CBD flower legality come from?


If there’s one thing we can be sure of, it’s that there is confusion around CBD’s legality in the UK. We’ve all heard stories of shops being raided by police, only for the police to apologize and say they did not realize the shop was selling CBD flower, and not cannabis containing THC designed to get the user high.




At the same time, we’ve all heard stories where a shop selling CBD flower was raided, and the police completely shut down their business. So why is there such a discrepancy on how and where the law is applied?




There are two main laws that are involved in the battle of CBD legality in the UK. The first law is the Misuse of Drugs Act which came into existence in 1971. The law states:




“cannabis” (except in the expression “cannabis resin”) means any plant of the genus Cannabis or any part of any such plant (by whatever name designated) except that it does not include cannabis resin or any of the following products after separation from the rest of the plant, namely—




Mature stalk of any such plant,


Fibre produced from mature stalk of any such plant, and


Seed of any such plant;]


“cannabis resin” means the separated resin, whether crude or purified, obtained from any plant of the genus Cannabis;




Under this broad definition of the cannabis plant, it is clear that all forms of cannabis are illegal to possess or sell in the UK. This would include strains that are grown to have almost no THC, such as the CBD flowers we are discussing.




If this were the only law that referenced cannabis plants, there wouldn’t really be any discussion to be had. However, in 2001, the UK government passed the Misuse of Drugs Relations which allows for a more varied interpretation of the legality of CBD-based cannabis overall.




The Misuse of Drugs Relations states that CBD itself is legal when it meets the following guidelines:




The preparation or other product is not designed for administration of the controlled drug to a human being or animal;


The controlled drug in any component part is packaged in such a form, or in combination with other active or inert substances in such a manner, that it cannot be recovered by readily applicable means or in a yield which constitutes a risk to health; and


No one component part of the product or preparation contains more than one milligram of the controlled drug or one microgram in the case of lysergide or any other N-alkyl derivative of lysergamide.


Under this law, CBD oil was made legal. You may even think after reading, that CBD flower would be allowed as well if it does not contain more than one milligram of “the controlled substance” THC and is not designed to get THC into people’s bloodstreams.




After consulting with experts, we can confirm that the language in the 1971 Misuse of Drugs Act supersedes the Misuse of Drugs Regulations passed in 2001. Essentially, while the Misuse of Drugs Regulations act legalized the compound CBD, it did not overturn the ruling in the 1971 Misuse of Drugs Act that indicates no one is allowed to possess the cannabis plant itself in any form.




Overall, it’s not too difficult to see where the confusion comes from. If you only refer to the more recently passed law, it would seem that CBD is legal, and that selling CBD flower would be legal as well. After all, selling CBD oil is legal, so why would selling the flower be any different?




This is the logic used by shop owners currently selling CBD flower. Unfortunately for them, while CBD oils are legal and free to be sold in the UK, the flower and plant materials themselves are illegal.




Even if you grew a strain with absolutely 0% THC and CBD, the hemp flower itself is illegal to possess in the UK. There is no further interpretation to be made, and the law is quite clear.




IS CBD Flower Legal?


How are shops selling CBD flower if it’s illegal?


The short answer is that they’re technically doing it illegally. While they may not agree with the law and believe they have legitimate loopholes due to the Misuse of Drugs Regulations law passed in 2001, their interpretation is incorrect.




The store owners that are currently selling CBD flower alongside their oils fall under 2 categories. Those who believe that any cannabis flower with under .2% THC meets the criteria for exemption outlined above, and those who realize the illegality of their practice but feel the law is outdated.




Some shops simply don’t believe that the law is correct on this matter and since they are genuinely not selling flower that will get the user high, there should not be any trouble with the law.




While there is somewhat sound logic behind this thinking, the fact of the matter is that all flower derived from hemp is illegal to possess in the UK. Regardless of composition, the flower itself cannot be held or sold.




How can I get my CBD legally in the UK?


Fortunately, those looking to obtain CBD legally in the UK do have the option of purchasing CBD oil. As mentioned above, the Misuse of Drugs Regulations law passed in 2001 exempts CBD from its previously illegal status.




CBD oils are sold across the UK at shops and online retailers, and are 100% legal to own and use as long as they do not possess “more than one milligram of the controlled substance”. You can rest easy knowing that you’re fully compliant with the law when purchasing CBD oils from shops or online.




If you prefer the experience of consuming CBD flower to an extracted product like oils, you will have to wait for the next piece of legislation to be passed to make this legal.




What does the future hold for legal CBD flower in the UK?


As of right now, the UK has no legislation planned to legalize the possession of the hemp flower itself. Despite other major countries across the world legalizing the full plant, THC included, the UK government has not indicated it intends to follow suit. There are advocates across the country, and this may change, but as of early 2021, there are no changes coming down the pipeline that we know of.




The only recent legislation related to CBD is focused on ensuring the quality and composition of the CBD oils that are currently legal. The Food Standards Agency announced its plan to help regulate the industry and announced a deadline of the 31st of March, 2021 for companies to apply for a license to sell CBD oils and extracts. Any companies that do not apply for the appropriate license will find their products deemed illegal and will risk being taken off of the shelves entirely.




This move comes as a way to hold CBD products to a high standard after investigations found that half of the CBD oils on the market did not contain their reported levels of CBD. This law will ensure that all CBD oils and products containing CBD contain the amounts of CBD they claim.




We’ll have to wait to see if new laws will be passed that make the sale of CBD flower legal, but until then, the law is clear. Possession and sale of CBD flower is illegal in the UK.




In the meantime, if you’re interested in learning more about CBD, or finding a trusted, independently tested provided – we highly recommend reading our Pure Sport CBD review – who are taking over the UK with their BSCG Certified (Banned Substances Control Group) CBD Products.




Is CBD flower legal in the UK?




There is no doubting the rise in popularity of CBD containing products in the United Kingdom. The last few years have seen products such as CBD oil, CBD vape liquids and CBD drinks enter the public eye with a bang. There is now a range of CBD products being sold in high street stores such as Boots and Superdrug.




Thanks to this rise in popularity, many more people are educating themselves about the health benefits of CBD. This is fueled by countless medical studies and anecdotal reports from users. People are turning to CBD to help with anxiety, stress, fitness and many other aspects of their lives.




CBD containing products such as oils are currently legal in the UK. They are considered exempt from the law thanks to three reasons as defined in the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001. The MDR states that a CBD product will be exempt from being illegal where it satisfies all three elements of the exempt product definition:




1) it is not designed for the administration of the controlled substance, ie THC




2) any THC elements of the product are packaged in such a way that it cannot be recovered by readily applicable means, or at a level which would constitute a risk to health;




3) it contains no more than one milligram per component part of the product.




Because products like CBD oils meet all of these criteria, they are exempt. But this exemption does not apply to CBD flowers.




What are CBD flowers or buds?


Known as CBD flower, CBD hash, CBD buds and CBD weed, many retailers, both online and on the high street, have begun selling flowers of the hemp plant that are high in CBD content (around 13-15%) and low in THC (usually less than 1%). These products look a lot like ‘normal’ THC rich cannabis. Thanks to selective breeding, growers have been able to take cannabis strains that are low in THC and high in CBD and other cannabinoids, crossing them to create CBD dominant strains. These flowers have become popular in states in the US and Canada where cannabis is legal, and have also gained popularity in European countries where exemptions have been made for cannabis and hemp which is low in THC.




In these countries, cannabis users are turning to CBD flowers as a way of consuming cannabis without getting high.




So are CBD flowers legal in the UK?


The short answer is no. CBD flowers are not legal in the UK. They are illegal as stated the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.




“cannabis” (except in the expression “cannabis resin”) means any plant of the genus Cannabis or any part of any such plant (by whatever name designated) except that it does not include cannabis resin or any of the following products after separation from the rest of the plant, namely—


(a) mature stalk of any such plant,


(b) fibre produced from mature stalk of any such plant, and


(c) seed of any such plant;]


“cannabis resin” means the separated resin, whether crude or purified, obtained from any plant of the genus Cannabis;




As the text clearly shows, there is no exemption or definition of cannabis by its cannabinoid content, therefore cannabis is illegal, whether it is high in THC or high in CBD.




Why is there confusion about CBD flowers in the UK?


Sellers and consumers often claim the that CBD flower and CBD bud is legal based on the fact that it has been sourced from ‘EU approved varieties’ and contains ‘less than 0.2% THC’, citing the exemption example given above. Further confusion arises from Home Office guidance, which states that CBD rich hemp can be legally grown in the UK, providing it is from approved seeds and the end product contains less than 0.2% THC. However, to grow this hemp, farmers must first obtain a hemp cultivation licence, and even then can only keep the seeds and fibres of the plant. All other parts of the plant, including the buds and flowers, must be destroyed. So even CBD flowers grown with a Home Office licence in the UK with less than 0.2% THC would still be considered illegal, and must not be sold online or in retail stores.




To clarify the matter, a prominent cannabis campaigner, Peter Reynolds, wrote to the Home Office, asking them to confirm the law. This was the response:




“Thank you for your email.




I can confirm that the leaves and flowers of the genus Cannabis are controlled and defined as cannabis as outlined in Section 37(1) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971




“cannabis” (except in the expression “cannabis resin”) means any plant of the genus cannabis or any part of any such plant (by whatever name designated) except that it does not include cannabis resin or any of the following products after separation from the rest of the plant, namely—


(a)mature stalk of any such plant,


(b)fibre produced from mature stalk of any such plant, and


(c)seed of any such plant;”.




Once the separation of the stalk and seeds from the plant has occurred it will not be defined as cannabis. This also extends to the fibre produced from the stalk.




Regards




Jill Frankham


Senior Compliance Officer


Drugs & Firearms Licensing Unit”




Why are CBD flowers still on sale in the UK if they are illegal?


Despite all of the above, many stores online and offline continue to flout the law. Unfortunately, ignorance is not considered a defence when it comes to criminal matters. In 2020 a number of CBD shops across the country were raided for selling CBD flowers. In one case, police involved in the operation were clear, stating that they believed the shops had been attempting to exploit a “loophole” that allows certain stores to sell cannabis containing up to 0.2% THC, though this in fact only applies to licensed pharmacies selling to people with a specific prescription.




“Unless you are a specifically licensed pharmacy, you cannot legally sell or supply cannabis or THC products – no matter what percentage content it has,” Police Constable Ross Bennett who investigated the case said.




How can I buy CBD flowers legally in the UK?


Until the law is updated to take into account the difference between CBD flowers and high THC cannabis, there is no legal way to buy CBD flowers online or in-store in the UK. The only legal way to possess cannabis is by obtaining a prescription. Since November 2018, it has been possible for cannabis to be prescribed for medical purposes only. It is difficult to obtain a medical cannabis prescription on the NHS, however, there are a number of private cannabis clinics that will issue prescriptions for genuine cases. Costs are prohibitive, but as more clinics open the cost for consultations and legally available products comes down. If you wish to be able to buy and possess CBD flowers of any form of cannabis in the UK, you will need to do so via a prescription.




Are CBD buds illegal in the UK?


‘CBD flower’ is easy to find online and on the high street. But what does the law say?




CBD weed, buds, hemp flower. Whatever you call it, there’s a lot of it around.


From vape shops to head shops to online stores, CBD buds are widely available. And some sellers claim, completely legal.




Packed with CBD and with minor cannabinoids like CBG and CBC, these flowers often come with rich terpene profiles to deliver that sought-after entourage effect.




Raw cannabis is very popular with both medical and recreational users for this very reason.




All about the THC?


The laws around CBD in the UK are notoriously confusing, even in 2021 when the public is pretty clued up about it.




One such law is the EU’s 0.2% THC cap. Consumers often interpret this to mean that CBD buds are legal as long as they contain less than 0.2% THC.




This tallies with the legal thinking in the US, where buds containing less than 0.3% THC can be sold legally.




Meanwhile, in Switzerland, the cap is 1% of the weight of the flower.




But the reality in the UK is not that straight forward.




CBD vs cannabis vs hemp




Cannabis is a Class B controlled drug under Schedule 1 of the Misuse of Drugs Regulations (MDR) 2001.




This classification applies to high-THC varieties and low-THC ‘hemp’ varieties, from which CBD can be legally extracted.




Farming hemp must contain no more than 0.2% THC and only the fibre and seeds can be processed for commercial use, if the grower has a license to do so.




The rest of the plant, including the flower, has to be destroyed.




Home Office Industrial Hemp guidance states:




“The ‘0.2%’ reference is used solely to identify varieties which may potentially be cultivated, within the scope of this policy, and to differentiate between the fee level is applicable under the Misuse of Drugs (Fees) Regulations 2010.”




Finished CBD products like tinctures and edibles should contain no more than 1mg of THC per container.




But this is irrelevant in the case of flower which is a Class B drug regardless of THC content.




Enforcement




Many retailers selling CBD buds are unaware that they are illegal, understandably confused by the supposedly iron-clad ‘THC rule.’




But British police maintain that ignorance is no excuse for breaking the law.




Numerous shops selling cannabis flower have been raided under the Misuse of Drugs act.




In August, police in Croydon seized a ‘large quantity’ of cannabis from three shops labelled as legal CBD suppliers.




Four people were arrested on suspicion of being concerned in the supply and importation of a Class B drug.




Police Constable Ross Bennett who investigated the case, said:




“It is also not a defence to tell officers that you thought your cannabis was legal because you bought it from a CBD shop – it is a class B drug and you will be dealt with accordingly.



Are CBD Flowers Legal UK?

cbd flowers uk • Apr 03, 2021

Are CBD Flowers Legal UK?



CBD Flowers are illegal to buy and sell in the UK




Cannabis in the United Kingdom is illegal for recreational use.




Possessing any part of cannabis and hemp plants remains illegal in the UK.




A CBD Flower is also referred to as a CBD Bud and they are part of the Cannabis plant.




Smoking CBD Flowers are a popular choice for consumption in 2021.




THC or tetrahydrocannabinol is the psychoactive component of flowers or the element that induces intoxication.




CBD flowers only comprise a trace amount of the THC compound allowing users to avoid the “high.”




CBD flower provides the essential benefits of the properties without the THC mind-altering effects.




CBD flowers are widely available to purchase in the UK both via high street CBD shops and online in 2021.




Suppliers will often claim that they are perfectly legal for sale and consumption, unfortunately, this is misleading as they are technically illegal




You may have heard sellers claim that their CBD buds are legal because they have a THC content of less than 0.2%.




The 0.2% rule actually exclusively refers to the maximum THC content that farmers can use for cultivation, and not to any finished product.




According to the Home Office’s fact sheet on CBD & Cannabinoids, finished products can contain no more than 1mg of a controlled substance per container, regardless of the container’s size.




However, even if the CBD Flower contained less than 1mg of THC, it would still be illegal.




A key point that suppliers often fail to mention is that Cannabis itself is a controlled substance, regardless of its cannabinoid composition.




A Lack of Enforcement in 2021



The main reason why is CBD flower is so widely available is because the majority of police choose not to enforce the law.




Which is understandable considering they pose little threat to health or society




More often than not, their valuable time and resources would be better spent elsewhere.




Jokes aside, there have been multiple cases of suppliers of CBD Flowers being prosecuted for the sale of a class B drug.




But we are not currently aware of any individuals being prosecuted for personal use.




In fact, many police forces across the UK are effectively deciding not to use legal action against cannabis users, due to the fact that many people use it for medical/health reasons and that it’s a huge waste of time during 2021.


CBD flowers are illegal to buy and sell in the UK.




As stated in the Misuse of Drugs Act of 1971, it remains illegal to cultivate cannabis (a controlled drug) and is therefore illegal to possess any part of the cannabis plant — a category which CBD flowers fall into.




CBD Flowers are widely available to purchase in the UK 2021 both via high street CBD shops and online Cannabis stores in the United Kingdom.




#cbdflowers @cbdflowers



In 2021 Is CBD Flower Legal in the UK?



There’s been a growing trend of retailers selling CBD flower in the UK over the past several years. You may have even walked into a shop and seen the flower on the counter and thought to yourself “Isn’t this illegal? How are they doing this?”. Which brings us to our big question;


Is CBD Flower Legal in the UK?

The answer is, no, CBD flower is not legal in the UK



While CBD flower does not possess a high enough concentration of the controlled substance THC to get you high, CBD flower is currently illegal to possess or sell in the UK.


We’ve dived deep into this matter, and confirmed its illegality beyond a shadow of a doubt. Despite some thinking it’s a legal grey area, we’ve confirmed our findings with Mackrells Solicitors, one of the top cannabis law firms in the country.


CBD Flower

What is CBD Flower and why do people want it?

Before getting into why this matter is so confusing, and why there is so much misinformation out there, it’s important to understand what exactly we’re talking about.


CBD flower is derived from the hemp plant and looks strikingly similar to its THC-containing counterpart. Unlike “normal” cannabis, CBD flower does not contain THC in any significant amount, and will not get the user high in the same way normal cannabis would.


Typically, normal cannabis strains that are grown to achieve a high will contain 15-30% THC. A flower that is grown for CBD use specifically will contain less than 1% THC, often falling under .2%.


So, if these strains will not get you high, why are people interested in buying them? Well, CBD provides many reported benefits to its users despite its lack of psychoactive components. CBD is seeing a rise in popularity as users report effects like general pain relief, relief from joint pain, reductions in anxiety and depressive symptoms, and assistance in getting a good night’s sleep.


These effects are currently being studied, and the research is not yet conclusive. While many users report these benefits and many initial studies appear to support them, more research is needed to confirm or deny these claims.


Where does the confusion regarding CBD flower legality come from?

If there’s one thing we can be sure of, it’s that there is confusion around CBD’s legality in the UK. We’ve all heard stories of shops being raided by police, only for the police to apologize and say they did not realize the shop was selling CBD flower, and not cannabis containing THC designed to get the user high.


At the same time, we’ve all heard stories where a shop selling CBD flower was raided, and the police completely shut down their business. So why is there such a discrepancy on how and where the law is applied?


There are two main laws that are involved in the battle of CBD legality in the UK. The first law is the Misuse of Drugs Act which came into existence in 1971. The law states:


“cannabis” (except in the expression “cannabis resin”) means any plant of the genus Cannabis or any part of any such plant (by whatever name designated) except that it does not include cannabis resin or any of the following products after separation from the rest of the plant, namely—


Mature stalk of any such plant,

Fibre produced from mature stalk of any such plant, and

Seed of any such plant;]

“cannabis resin” means the separated resin, whether crude or purified, obtained from any plant of the genus Cannabis;


Under this broad definition of the cannabis plant, it is clear that all forms of cannabis are illegal to possess or sell in the UK. This would include strains that are grown to have almost no THC, such as the CBD flowers we are discussing.


If this were the only law that referenced cannabis plants, there wouldn’t really be any discussion to be had. However, in 2001, the UK government passed the Misuse of Drugs Relations which allows for a more varied interpretation of the legality of CBD-based cannabis overall.


The Misuse of Drugs Relations states that CBD itself is legal when it meets the following guidelines:


The preparation or other product is not designed for administration of the controlled drug to a human being or animal;

The controlled drug in any component part is packaged in such a form, or in combination with other active or inert substances in such a manner, that it cannot be recovered by readily applicable means or in a yield which constitutes a risk to health; and

No one component part of the product or preparation contains more than one milligram of the controlled drug or one microgram in the case of lysergide or any other N-alkyl derivative of lysergamide.

Under this law, CBD oil was made legal. You may even think after reading, that CBD flower would be allowed as well if it does not contain more than one milligram of “the controlled substance” THC and is not designed to get THC into people’s bloodstreams.


After consulting with experts, we can confirm that the language in the 1971 Misuse of Drugs Act supersedes the Misuse of Drugs Regulations passed in 2001. Essentially, while the Misuse of Drugs Regulations act legalized the compound CBD, it did not overturn the ruling in the 1971 Misuse of Drugs Act that indicates no one is allowed to possess the cannabis plant itself in any form.


Overall, it’s not too difficult to see where the confusion comes from. If you only refer to the more recently passed law, it would seem that CBD is legal, and that selling CBD flower would be legal as well. After all, selling CBD oil is legal, so why would selling the flower be any different?


This is the logic used by shop owners currently selling CBD flower. Unfortunately for them, while CBD oils are legal and free to be sold in the UK, the flower and plant materials themselves are illegal.


Even if you grew a strain with absolutely 0% THC and CBD, the hemp flower itself is illegal to possess in the UK. There is no further interpretation to be made, and the law is quite clear.


IS CBD Flower Legal?

How are shops selling CBD flower if it’s illegal?

The short answer is that they’re technically doing it illegally. While they may not agree with the law and believe they have legitimate loopholes due to the Misuse of Drugs Regulations law passed in 2001, their interpretation is incorrect.


The store owners that are currently selling CBD flower alongside their oils fall under 2 categories. Those who believe that any cannabis flower with under .2% THC meets the criteria for exemption outlined above, and those who realize the illegality of their practice but feel the law is outdated.


Some shops simply don’t believe that the law is correct on this matter and since they are genuinely not selling flower that will get the user high, there should not be any trouble with the law.


While there is somewhat sound logic behind this thinking, the fact of the matter is that all flower derived from hemp is illegal to possess in the UK. Regardless of composition, the flower itself cannot be held or sold.


How can I get my CBD legally in the UK?

Fortunately, those looking to obtain CBD legally in the UK do have the option of purchasing CBD oil. As mentioned above, the Misuse of Drugs Regulations law passed in 2001 exempts CBD from its previously illegal status.


CBD oils are sold across the UK at shops and online retailers, and are 100% legal to own and use as long as they do not possess “more than one milligram of the controlled substance”. You can rest easy knowing that you’re fully compliant with the law when purchasing CBD oils from shops or online.


If you prefer the experience of consuming CBD flower to an extracted product like oils, you will have to wait for the next piece of legislation to be passed to make this legal.


What does the future hold for legal CBD flower in the UK?

As of right now, the UK has no legislation planned to legalize the possession of the hemp flower itself. Despite other major countries across the world legalizing the full plant, THC included, the UK government has not indicated it intends to follow suit. There are advocates across the country, and this may change, but as of early 2021, there are no changes coming down the pipeline that we know of.


The only recent legislation related to CBD is focused on ensuring the quality and composition of the CBD oils that are currently legal. The Food Standards Agency announced its plan to help regulate the industry and announced a deadline of the 31st of March, 2021 for companies to apply for a license to sell CBD oils and extracts. Any companies that do not apply for the appropriate license will find their products deemed illegal and will risk being taken off of the shelves entirely.


This move comes as a way to hold CBD products to a high standard after investigations found that half of the CBD oils on the market did not contain their reported levels of CBD. This law will ensure that all CBD oils and products containing CBD contain the amounts of CBD they claim.


We’ll have to wait to see if new laws will be passed that make the sale of CBD flower legal, but until then, the law is clear. Possession and sale of CBD flower is illegal in the UK.


In the meantime, if you’re interested in learning more about CBD, or finding a trusted, independently tested provided – we highly recommend reading our Pure Sport CBD review – who are taking over the UK with their BSCG Certified (Banned Substances Control Group) CBD Products.


Is CBD flower legal in the UK?


There is no doubting the rise in popularity of CBD containing products in the United Kingdom. The last few years have seen products such as CBD oil, CBD vape liquids and CBD drinks enter the public eye with a bang. There is now a range of CBD products being sold in high street stores such as Boots and Superdrug.


Thanks to this rise in popularity, many more people are educating themselves about the health benefits of CBD. This is fueled by countless medical studies and anecdotal reports from users. People are turning to CBD to help with anxiety, stress, fitness and many other aspects of their lives.


CBD containing products such as oils are currently legal in the UK. They are considered exempt from the law thanks to three reasons as defined in the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001. The MDR states that a CBD product will be exempt from being illegal where it satisfies all three elements of the exempt product definition:


1) it is not designed for the administration of the controlled substance, ie THC


2) any THC elements of the product are packaged in such a way that it cannot be recovered by readily applicable means, or at a level which would constitute a risk to health;


3) it contains no more than one milligram per component part of the product.


Because products like CBD oils meet all of these criteria, they are exempt. But this exemption does not apply to CBD flowers.


What are CBD flowers or buds?

Known as CBD flower, CBD hash, CBD buds and CBD weed, many retailers, both online and on the high street, have begun selling flowers of the hemp plant that are high in CBD content (around 13-15%) and low in THC (usually less than 1%). These products look a lot like ‘normal’ THC rich cannabis. Thanks to selective breeding, growers have been able to take cannabis strains that are low in THC and high in CBD and other cannabinoids, crossing them to create CBD dominant strains. These flowers have become popular in states in the US and Canada where cannabis is legal, and have also gained popularity in European countries where exemptions have been made for cannabis and hemp which is low in THC.


In these countries, cannabis users are turning to CBD flowers as a way of consuming cannabis without getting high.


So are CBD flowers legal in the UK?

The short answer is no. CBD flowers are not legal in the UK. They are illegal as stated the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.


“cannabis” (except in the expression “cannabis resin”) means any plant of the genus Cannabis or any part of any such plant (by whatever name designated) except that it does not include cannabis resin or any of the following products after separation from the rest of the plant, namely—

(a) mature stalk of any such plant,

(b) fibre produced from mature stalk of any such plant, and

(c) seed of any such plant;]

“cannabis resin” means the separated resin, whether crude or purified, obtained from any plant of the genus Cannabis;


As the text clearly shows, there is no exemption or definition of cannabis by its cannabinoid content, therefore cannabis is illegal, whether it is high in THC or high in CBD.


Why is there confusion about CBD flowers in the UK?

Sellers and consumers often claim the that CBD flower and CBD bud is legal based on the fact that it has been sourced from ‘EU approved varieties’ and contains ‘less than 0.2% THC’, citing the exemption example given above. Further confusion arises from Home Office guidance, which states that CBD rich hemp can be legally grown in the UK, providing it is from approved seeds and the end product contains less than 0.2% THC. However, to grow this hemp, farmers must first obtain a hemp cultivation licence, and even then can only keep the seeds and fibres of the plant. All other parts of the plant, including the buds and flowers, must be destroyed. So even CBD flowers grown with a Home Office licence in the UK with less than 0.2% THC would still be considered illegal, and must not be sold online or in retail stores.


To clarify the matter, a prominent cannabis campaigner, Peter Reynolds, wrote to the Home Office, asking them to confirm the law. This was the response:


“Thank you for your email.


I can confirm that the leaves and flowers of the genus Cannabis are controlled and defined as cannabis as outlined in Section 37(1) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971


“cannabis” (except in the expression “cannabis resin”) means any plant of the genus cannabis or any part of any such plant (by whatever name designated) except that it does not include cannabis resin or any of the following products after separation from the rest of the plant, namely—

(a)mature stalk of any such plant,

(b)fibre produced from mature stalk of any such plant, and

(c)seed of any such plant;”.


Once the separation of the stalk and seeds from the plant has occurred it will not be defined as cannabis. This also extends to the fibre produced from the stalk.


Regards


Jill Frankham

Senior Compliance Officer

Drugs & Firearms Licensing Unit”


Why are CBD flowers still on sale in the UK if they are illegal?

Despite all of the above, many stores online and offline continue to flout the law. Unfortunately, ignorance is not considered a defence when it comes to criminal matters. In 2020 a number of CBD shops across the country were raided for selling CBD flowers. In one case, police involved in the operation were clear, stating that they believed the shops had been attempting to exploit a “loophole” that allows certain stores to sell cannabis containing up to 0.2% THC, though this in fact only applies to licensed pharmacies selling to people with a specific prescription.


“Unless you are a specifically licensed pharmacy, you cannot legally sell or supply cannabis or THC products – no matter what percentage content it has,” Police Constable Ross Bennett who investigated the case said.


How can I buy CBD flowers legally in the UK?

Until the law is updated to take into account the difference between CBD flowers and high THC cannabis, there is no legal way to buy CBD flowers online or in-store in the UK. The only legal way to possess cannabis is by obtaining a prescription. Since November 2018, it has been possible for cannabis to be prescribed for medical purposes only. It is difficult to obtain a medical cannabis prescription on the NHS, however, there are a number of private cannabis clinics that will issue prescriptions for genuine cases. Costs are prohibitive, but as more clinics open the cost for consultations and legally available products comes down. If you wish to be able to buy and possess CBD flowers of any form of cannabis in the UK, you will need to do so via a prescription.


Are CBD buds illegal in the UK?

‘CBD flower’ is easy to find online and on the high street. But what does the law say?


CBD weed, buds, hemp flower. Whatever you call it, there’s a lot of it around.

From vape shops to head shops to online stores, CBD buds are widely available. And some sellers claim, completely legal.


Packed with CBD and with minor cannabinoids like CBG and CBC, these flowers often come with rich terpene profiles to deliver that sought-after entourage effect.


Raw cannabis is very popular with both medical and recreational users for this very reason.


All about the THC?

The laws around CBD in the UK are notoriously confusing, even in 2021 when the public is pretty clued up about it.


One such law is the EU’s 0.2% THC cap. Consumers often interpret this to mean that CBD buds are legal as long as they contain less than 0.2% THC.


This tallies with the legal thinking in the US, where buds containing less than 0.3% THC can be sold legally.


Meanwhile, in Switzerland, the cap is 1% of the weight of the flower.


But the reality in the UK is not that straight forward.


CBD vs cannabis vs hemp


Cannabis is a Class B controlled drug under Schedule 1 of the Misuse of Drugs Regulations (MDR) 2001.


This classification applies to high-THC varieties and low-THC ‘hemp’ varieties, from which CBD can be legally extracted.


Farming hemp must contain no more than 0.2% THC and only the fibre and seeds can be processed for commercial use, if the grower has a license to do so.


The rest of the plant, including the flower, has to be destroyed.


Home Office Industrial Hemp guidance states:


“The ‘0.2%’ reference is used solely to identify varieties which may potentially be cultivated, within the scope of this policy, and to differentiate between the fee level is applicable under the Misuse of Drugs (Fees) Regulations 2010.”


Finished CBD products like tinctures and edibles should contain no more than 1mg of THC per container.


But this is irrelevant in the case of flower which is a Class B drug regardless of THC content.


Enforcement


Many retailers selling CBD buds are unaware that they are illegal, understandably confused by the supposedly iron-clad ‘THC rule.’


But British police maintain that ignorance is no excuse for breaking the law.


Numerous shops selling cannabis flower have been raided under the Misuse of Drugs act.


In August, police in Croydon seized a ‘large quantity’ of cannabis from three shops labelled as legal CBD suppliers.


Four people were arrested on suspicion of being concerned in the supply and importation of a Class B drug.


Police Constable Ross Bennett who investigated the case, said:


“It is also not a defence to tell officers that you thought your cannabis was legal because you bought it from a CBD shop – it is a class B drug and you will be dealt with accordingly.”


are cbd flowers legal uk



is cbd flower legal UK 2021


Are CBD Flowers Legal in the UK?




Consumer cannabidiol (CBD) products



call for evidence




Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) call for evidence on cannabinoids in CBD products.


The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) has been commissioned to provide impartial and independent scientific advice on the acceptable levels of constituent cannabinoids in cannabidiol (CBD) products (in other words, other than CBD itself) marketed as consumer products.


The commission does not extend to prescribed products/medicines. The ACMD invites all sections of society to provide written evidence with regards to this commission.


We are specifically seeking evidence on the following questions. Your written submission can provide responses to some or all of the questions:


The commission refers to the cannabinoids Δ9-THC, CBN and THCV. Are there any further phytocannabinoids which should be considered? If so, which cannabinoids and please provide evidence.


At what dose would each of these cannabinoids cause a psychoactive effect in humans? Are there any potential harmful effects at these doses?


What are the conditions that precursors of cannabinoids such as Δ9-THCA-A might be transformed into controlled cannabinoids?


What is the combined level of the psychoactive cannabinoids that would not produce a psychoactive effect (in other words maximum combined dose of active ingredients) given the standard use of consumer CBD products?


Are you aware of any evidence of CBD products causing adverse reactions or harms which might be attributable to cannabinoid impurities? If so, please attach such evidence.


For producers of CBD-containing products for supply to consumers, what certification of quality of CBD extracts from raw materials do you require or expect?


For which controlled phytocannabinoids are there reference standards available or likely to become available in the near future for their use in testing?


Please note that owing to the specific focus of this ministerial commission, the ACMD will only consider information relevant to these questions. Additional information will not be considered.




CBD and CBD-based products are taking the UK by storm. With cannabis remaining (mostly) illegal in the UK, other means of marijuana are slowly making their way into our lives and onto our shelves. A variety of CBD products such as: CBD hemp gummies, CBD oils, CBD hemp pain relief cream and CBD flowers, are becoming more and more mainstream in the UK and around the world. But whilst some are legal, others are not. Today we’re going to be delving into the question of: are CBC flowers legal in the UK? As usual with UK drug laws, the answer is somewhat confusing, but we’ve fortunately done all of the research you need to know in order to understand the drug laws around CBD flowers. We’ll also throw in some information on how to safely purchase CBD flowers too. For good measure. As always, strap yourself in. Let’s go.



What is CBD and THC?


First things first, let’s define the terms CBD and THC because they are going to be coming up a lot in our discussion of CBD flowers.


THC


THC has psychoactive effects that produce the ‘high’ feeling people experience when inhaling weed; feelings of euphoria and joy. The higher the THC percentage, the more intense that high is. THC is illegal in the UK if it’s above 0.2% within the product.


CBD


Alternatively, CBD does not have psychoactive effects. If anything, it has calming tendencies. CBD is used mostly in wellness products, which focus on healing, anti-inflammation and helping with anxiety and sleep deprivation.



What are CBD Flowers?


So, what are CBD flowers? Some call them CBD buds, CBD hash, CBD weed, but either way, CBD flowers are buds from the marijuana plant that are high in CBD and low in THC. They look exactly the same as usual marijuana, but what’s inside has been altered by the creators. THC and CBD may be the most prominent cannabinoids with cannabis, but they are still very different. The percentage of each within a bud will lead to extremely different feelings. CBD flowers usually contain around 15% CBD and 0.2% THC.


CBD flowers are for those who prefer high CBD, low THC products. Usually this is for medicinal purposes or simply due to preference.


Benefits of CBD


What are the benefits of CBD?


Well, despite the research into CBD being slightly controversial, here is a list of the main health benefits of CBD.


Many people use CBD everyday to help both physical and mental illnesses.


CBD has been seen to help with:


Anxiety


Depression


Stress


PTSD


Sleep Deprivation


Bone Growth


Inflammation


Pain


Muscle Spasming


Nausea


Blood Sugar Levels



Are CBD Flowers Legal in the UK?


One of the biggest questions on any weed-lovers lips is:


Is weed legal in the UK?


The truth is, UK drug laws on marijuana are somewhat inconsistent. Whilst CBD oils, CBD hemp gummies and CBD pain relief cream are legal to purchase within the UK, for some reason, CBD flowers are not.


The Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 clearly states that cannabis is illegal. And they define cannabis as this:


“cannabis” (except in the expression “cannabis resin”) means any plant of the genus Cannabis or any part of any such plant (by whatever name designated) except that it does not include cannabis resin or any of the following products after separation from the rest of the plant, namely—


(a) mature stalk of any such plant,


(b) fibre produced from mature stalk of any such plant, and


(c) seed of any such plant;]


“cannabis resin” means the separated resin, whether crude or purified, obtained from any plant of the genus Cannabis;


This was how it was in the UK until CBD products and CBD health benefits became more mainstream.


Then came along the Misuse of Drugs Regulations Act 2001.


The Act stated that CBD products would be legal if they satisfied all three steps towards legalization:


1) it is not designed for the administration of the controlled substance, ie THC


2) any THC elements of the product are packaged in such a way that it cannot be recovered by readily applicable means, or at a level which would constitute a risk to health;


3) it contains no more than one milligram per component part of the product.


CBD flowers not only satisfy these steps, but also satisfy European law, which states that if a product has THC levels of 0.2% then they are deemed legal. However, according to UK law, CBD flowers are not legal. The opinion of the government is that European laws are not the same as UK laws. This is where the confusion starts. Especially as the UK also states that certain seeds are legal to grow if they have less than 0.2% THC. However, in order to do this, you would need a hemp cultivation licence. It gets even weirder, because even if you had a licence, it would still be illegal to keep any of the buds after growing them. The confusion around CBD flowers is yet another example of the UK’s inconsistent and essentially weird drug regulations.



Where can I Buy CBD Flowers?


Despite CBD flowers being technically illegal, they are still all over the internet for easy purchase. In fact, very rarely do the websites even inform customers that CBD flowers are illegal in the UK. It is quite common that customers buy CBD flowers without realising they are illegal, and will most likely use them without even being caught.


However, if that’s a risk you aren’t willing to take, then why not try other CBD-based products. CBD hemp gummies, for example, are legal and are easy to buy. There are lots of benefits of CBD gummies, they have much the same effects as CBD flowers. Also, for physical ailments, why not try CBD hemp pain relief cream.


However, if you are interested in purchasing CBD flowers off the internet regardless then it’s important to know a few helpful things. Dry herb vaporizers are legal to buy and they are a way to inhale your dry herb without needing tobacco or needing to burn anything. A dry herb vaporizer creates vapour at a lower temperature, rather than smoke at a higher temperature, which makes it a much healthier option to smoking. It might just be the perfect way to inhale your CBD flowers.


In addition, if you’re using CBD flowers for medicinal purposes, why not apply for a Cancard. The Cancard is a cannabis allowance card which can be applied for if your doctor has prescribed you medicinal marijuana. Since 2018, medicinal marijuana has been legal, but very expensive to get a hold of. Therefore, if you have a Cancard, you can avoid being prosecuted for using marijuana medicinally. What is the cancard? Find out here.



When will CBD Flowers be Legal in the UK?


Now you have all the information you need on CBD flowers, the only question left to answer is: when will they be legal in the UK? With the Cancard being released in 2020, and medicinal marijuana being legalized (sort of) in 2018, it seems that the UK are slowly moving towards a more accepting stance on marijuana. Whilst legalizing CBD flowers, and allowing people to actually smoke bud around the UK, might be a precedent that the government are not yet ready for, it’s surely only a matter of time.


We hope you enjoyed the article, and as always, found it educational. Until next time.



Summary


Article NameAre CBD Flowers Legal in the UK?


DescriptionToday we’re going to be delving into the question of: are CBC flowers legal in the UK? As usual with UK drug laws, the answer is somewhat confusing, but we’ve fortunately done all of the research you need to know in order to understand the drug laws around CBD flowers. We’ll also throw in some information on how to safely purchase CBD flowers too. For good measure. As always, strap yourself in. Let’s go.








CBD Flowers: What are they, Are they Legal In the UK


Recent reports from the verdict indicate that the global cannabidiol (CBD) market is estimated to grow by 700%. This shows the rise in popularity of CBD products in the UK.


Although CBD-based products have been commercially available in the UK for some time, they appear to be gaining greater mainstream use and acceptance, as big-name companies invest increasing amounts of money in developing CBD-based products.


What about CBD Flower / Buds?


Despite its increasing popularity of CBD products, one of the lesser-known CBD goods available to buy online is CBD flowers.


So what are they? What are they used for? And are they legal in the UK? Let’s take a closer look.


Table of Contents


What about CBD Flower / Buds?


What is CBD?


What is CBD Flower?


Are CBD Flowers Legal in the UK?


So, if CBD flowers are illegal, why are they so readily available to buy online?


The Conclusion?


What is CBD?


CBD, or Cannabidiol, is one of over a hundred cannabinoid compounds found in the Cannabis Sativa, or Hemp, plant.


CBD is most commonly extracted from the flowers, stalks and leaves of the hemp plant and added to a carrier oil, such as hemp seed oil, to create CBD oil – a food supplement that CBD can use to support wellbeing and healthy living.


These hemp plant strains are cultivated for their high CBD levels but have a deficient THC level (Tetrahydrocannabinol).


Unlike THC, CBD is a non-psychoactive substance, which means that users don’t get the “high” that’s often associated with recreational cannabis use.


What is Flower?


A CBD flower is a term used to refer to the flower, or bud, of the Hemp plant.


CBD flowers have grown in popularity in recent years, as the demand for CBD products has increased, with people looking for new and interesting ways to add CBD to their diet.


These flowers are essentially the same part of the plant that recreational cannabis users use. However, because they are from a different strain of the cannabis plant, they do not contain THC levels.


The flowers are sold by online retailers for users to smoke or create CBD edibles in the same way they would with recreational cannabis.


Are CBD Flowers Legal in the UK?


In short, No CBD Flower is not legal in the UK. The UK law states that as it is classed as part of the cannabis plant, it falls under the Misuse of Drugs Act of 1971, currently in effect as a controlled drug.


The Medicpro state that CBD flowers: The sale of ‘CBD Flowers’ and buds is prohibited even if THC is below 0.2% and from EU approved origin.


While it’s perfectly legal to buy CBD oil and other CBD products on the high street or online because you’re buying a finished retail product, the issue with CBD flower/bud arises because there are laws and restrictions on the cultivation of the Hemp plant.


Cultivation requires a license in the UK and means that only the fibre and seeds can be processed for commercial use, with the rest of the plant, including the flowers, to be destroyed.


CBD flowers look and smell identical to those used for recreational cannabis use, so it would be impossible for the UK police or any other law enforcement agency to distinguish between the two.


So, if CBD flowers are illegal, why are they so readily available to buy online?


The short answer is that the government and the organisations in charge of enforcing these laws don’t have the necessary resources to impose the law on those selling the products online or simply haven’t had a chance to catch up with each of the sellers yet.


A small number of vape shops have been closed down temporarily due to selling CBD flower in the UK recently in Plymouth, UK, who were importing CBD flower from Switzerland they claimed it was totally legal in the UK. Still, The Police told them that they were illegal to sell in the UK by the local police.


If you’re the end-user and you’re caught in possession of CBD flowers / CBD Bud, there is still a chance you could face charges under the Misuse of Drugs Act because a CBD flower is from the cannabis plant, so it is considered a Class B drug.


In our belief, it’s simply not worth the risk to buy an illegal product like CBD flowers when there are countless CBD products available that are perfectly legal to buy and possess.


The Conclusion?


CBD flowers might be easy to find and purchase online, but there will always be a risk that doing so could result in prosecution.


While the risk may be small, it seems unnecessary given the sheer number of CBD products that are now available legally both online and on the high street.


If you’re going to buy CBD, make sure it’s from a reputable brand that can provide lab results to verify the compounds present in their products so that you know for certain what the products contain.


There can be much confusing information out there, so if you’re still unsure about CBD, you can contact the UK CBD Oils team for further support.






CBD FLOWERS LEGAL




In 2021 Is CBD Flower Legal in the UK?




There’s been a growing trend of retailers selling CBD flower in the UK over the past several years. You may have even walked into a shop and seen the flower on the counter and thought to yourself “Isn’t this illegal? How are they doing this?”. Which brings us to our big question;




Is CBD Flower Legal in the UK?


Well, your instincts are correct. The short answer is, no, CBD flower is not legal in the UK. While CBD flower does not possess a high enough concentration of the controlled substance THC to get you high, CBD flower is currently illegal to possess or sell in the UK.




We’ve dived deep into this matter, and confirmed its illegality beyond a shadow of a doubt. Despite some thinking it’s a legal grey area, we’ve confirmed our findings with Mackrells Solicitors, one of the top cannabis law firms in the country.




CBD Flower


What is CBD Flower and why do people want it?


Before getting into why this matter is so confusing, and why there is so much misinformation out there, it’s important to understand what exactly we’re talking about.




CBD flower is derived from the hemp plant and looks strikingly similar to its THC-containing counterpart. Unlike “normal” cannabis, CBD flower does not contain THC in any significant amount, and will not get the user high in the same way normal cannabis would.




CBD Flowers: What are they, Are they Legal In the UK


24/03/2021


Recent reports from the verdict indicate that the global cannabidiol (CBD) market is estimated to grow by 700%. This shows the rise in popularity of CBD products in the UK.




Although CBD-based products have been commercially available in the UK for some time, they appear to be gaining greater mainstream use and acceptance, as big-name companies invest increasing amounts of money in developing CBD-based products.




What about CBD Flower / Buds?


Despite its increasing popularity of CBD products, one of the lesser-known CBD goods available to buy online is CBD flowers.




So what are they? What are they used for? And are they legal in the UK? Let’s take a closer look.




Table of Contents


What about CBD Flower / Buds?


What is CBD?


What is CBD Flower?


Are CBD Flowers Legal in the UK?


So, if CBD flowers are illegal, why are they so readily available to buy online?


The Conclusion?


What is CBD?


CBD, or Cannabidiol, is one of over a hundred cannabinoid compound


Typically, normal cannabis strains that are grown to achieve a high will contain 15-30% THC. A flower that is grown for CBD use specifically will contain less than 1% THC, often falling under .2%.




So, if these strains will not get you high, why are people interested in buying them? Well, CBD provides many reported benefits to its users despite its lack of psychoactive components. CBD is seeing a rise in popularity as users report effects like general pain relief, relief from joint pain, reductions in anxiety and depressive symptoms, and assistance in getting a good night’s sleep.




These effects are currently being studied, and the research is not yet conclusive. While many users report these benefits and many initial studies appear to support them, more research is needed to confirm or deny these claims.




Where does the confusion regarding CBD flower legality come from?


If there’s one thing we can be sure of, it’s that there is confusion around CBD’s legality in the UK. We’ve all heard stories of shops being raided by police, only for the police to apologize and say they did not realize the shop was selling CBD flower, and not cannabis containing THC designed to get the user high.




At the same time, we’ve all heard stories where a shop selling CBD flower was raided, and the police completely shut down their business. So why is there such a discrepancy on how and where the law is applied?




There are two main laws that are involved in the battle of CBD legality in the UK. The first law is the Misuse of Drugs Act which came into existence in 1971. The law states:




“cannabis” (except in the expression “cannabis resin”) means any plant of the genus Cannabis or any part of any such plant (by whatever name designated) except that it does not include cannabis resin or any of the following products after separation from the rest of the plant, namely—




Mature stalk of any such plant,


Fibre produced from mature stalk of any such plant, and


Seed of any such plant;]


“cannabis resin” means the separated resin, whether crude or purified, obtained from any plant of the genus Cannabis;




Under this broad definition of the cannabis plant, it is clear that all forms of cannabis are illegal to possess or sell in the UK. This would include strains that are grown to have almost no THC, such as the CBD flowers we are discussing.




If this were the only law that referenced cannabis plants, there wouldn’t really be any discussion to be had. However, in 2001, the UK government passed the Misuse of Drugs Relations which allows for a more varied interpretation of the legality of CBD-based cannabis overall.




The Misuse of Drugs Relations states that CBD itself is legal when it meets the following guidelines:




The preparation or other product is not designed for administration of the controlled drug to a human being or animal;


The controlled drug in any component part is packaged in such a form, or in combination with other active or inert substances in such a manner, that it cannot be recovered by readily applicable means or in a yield which constitutes a risk to health; and


No one component part of the product or preparation contains more than one milligram of the controlled drug or one microgram in the case of lysergide or any other N-alkyl derivative of lysergamide.


Under this law, CBD oil was made legal. You may even think after reading, that CBD flower would be allowed as well if it does not contain more than one milligram of “the controlled substance” THC and is not designed to get THC into people’s bloodstreams.




After consulting with experts, we can confirm that the language in the 1971 Misuse of Drugs Act supersedes the Misuse of Drugs Regulations passed in 2001. Essentially, while the Misuse of Drugs Regulations act legalized the compound CBD, it did not overturn the ruling in the 1971 Misuse of Drugs Act that indicates no one is allowed to possess the cannabis plant itself in any form.




Overall, it’s not too difficult to see where the confusion comes from. If you only refer to the more recently passed law, it would seem that CBD is legal, and that selling CBD flower would be legal as well. After all, selling CBD oil is legal, so why would selling the flower be any different?




This is the logic used by shop owners currently selling CBD flower. Unfortunately for them, while CBD oils are legal and free to be sold in the UK, the flower and plant materials themselves are illegal.




Even if you grew a strain with absolutely 0% THC and CBD, the hemp flower itself is illegal to possess in the UK. There is no further interpretation to be made, and the law is quite clear.




IS CBD Flower Legal?


How are shops selling CBD flower if it’s illegal?


The short answer is that they’re technically doing it illegally. While they may not agree with the law and believe they have legitimate loopholes due to the Misuse of Drugs Regulations law passed in 2001, their interpretation is incorrect.




The store owners that are currently selling CBD flower alongside their oils fall under 2 categories. Those who believe that any cannabis flower with under .2% THC meets the criteria for exemption outlined above, and those who realize the illegality of their practice but feel the law is outdated.




Some shops simply don’t believe that the law is correct on this matter and since they are genuinely not selling flower that will get the user high, there should not be any trouble with the law.




While there is somewhat sound logic behind this thinking, the fact of the matter is that all flower derived from hemp is illegal to possess in the UK. Regardless of composition, the flower itself cannot be held or sold.




How can I get my CBD legally in the UK?


Fortunately, those looking to obtain CBD legally in the UK do have the option of purchasing CBD oil. As mentioned above, the Misuse of Drugs Regulations law passed in 2001 exempts CBD from its previously illegal status.




CBD oils are sold across the UK at shops and online retailers, and are 100% legal to own and use as long as they do not possess “more than one milligram of the controlled substance”. You can rest easy knowing that you’re fully compliant with the law when purchasing CBD oils from shops or online.




If you prefer the experience of consuming CBD flower to an extracted product like oils, you will have to wait for the next piece of legislation to be passed to make this legal.




What does the future hold for legal CBD flower in the UK?


As of right now, the UK has no legislation planned to legalize the possession of the hemp flower itself. Despite other major countries across the world legalizing the full plant, THC included, the UK government has not indicated it intends to follow suit. There are advocates across the country, and this may change, but as of early 2021, there are no changes coming down the pipeline that we know of.




The only recent legislation related to CBD is focused on ensuring the quality and composition of the CBD oils that are currently legal. The Food Standards Agency announced its plan to help regulate the industry and announced a deadline of the 31st of March, 2021 for companies to apply for a license to sell CBD oils and extracts. Any companies that do not apply for the appropriate license will find their products deemed illegal and will risk being taken off of the shelves entirely.




This move comes as a way to hold CBD products to a high standard after investigations found that half of the CBD oils on the market did not contain their reported levels of CBD. This law will ensure that all CBD oils and products containing CBD contain the amounts of CBD they claim.




We’ll have to wait to see if new laws will be passed that make the sale of CBD flower legal, but until then, the law is clear. Possession and sale of CBD flower is illegal in the UK.




In the meantime, if you’re interested in learning more about CBD, or finding a trusted, independently tested provided – we highly recommend reading our Pure Sport CBD review – who are taking over the UK with their BSCG Certified (Banned Substances Control Group) CBD Products.




Is CBD flower legal in the UK?




There is no doubting the rise in popularity of CBD containing products in the United Kingdom. The last few years have seen products such as CBD oil, CBD vape liquids and CBD drinks enter the public eye with a bang. There is now a range of CBD products being sold in high street stores such as Boots and Superdrug.




Thanks to this rise in popularity, many more people are educating themselves about the health benefits of CBD. This is fueled by countless medical studies and anecdotal reports from users. People are turning to CBD to help with anxiety, stress, fitness and many other aspects of their lives.




CBD containing products such as oils are currently legal in the UK. They are considered exempt from the law thanks to three reasons as defined in the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001. The MDR states that a CBD product will be exempt from being illegal where it satisfies all three elements of the exempt product definition:




1) it is not designed for the administration of the controlled substance, ie THC




2) any THC elements of the product are packaged in such a way that it cannot be recovered by readily applicable means, or at a level which would constitute a risk to health;




3) it contains no more than one milligram per component part of the product.




Because products like CBD oils meet all of these criteria, they are exempt. But this exemption does not apply to CBD flowers.




What are CBD flowers or buds?


Known as CBD flower, CBD hash, CBD buds and CBD weed, many retailers, both online and on the high street, have begun selling flowers of the hemp plant that are high in CBD content (around 13-15%) and low in THC (usually less than 1%). These products look a lot like ‘normal’ THC rich cannabis. Thanks to selective breeding, growers have been able to take cannabis strains that are low in THC and high in CBD and other cannabinoids, crossing them to create CBD dominant strains. These flowers have become popular in states in the US and Canada where cannabis is legal, and have also gained popularity in European countries where exemptions have been made for cannabis and hemp which is low in THC.




In these countries, cannabis users are turning to CBD flowers as a way of consuming cannabis without getting high.




So are CBD flowers legal in the UK?


The short answer is no. CBD flowers are not legal in the UK. They are illegal as stated the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.




“cannabis” (except in the expression “cannabis resin”) means any plant of the genus Cannabis or any part of any such plant (by whatever name designated) except that it does not include cannabis resin or any of the following products after separation from the rest of the plant, namely—


(a) mature stalk of any such plant,


(b) fibre produced from mature stalk of any such plant, and


(c) seed of any such plant;]


“cannabis resin” means the separated resin, whether crude or purified, obtained from any plant of the genus Cannabis;




As the text clearly shows, there is no exemption or definition of cannabis by its cannabinoid content, therefore cannabis is illegal, whether it is high in THC or high in CBD.




Why is there confusion about CBD flowers in the UK?


Sellers and consumers often claim the that CBD flower and CBD bud is legal based on the fact that it has been sourced from ‘EU approved varieties’ and contains ‘less than 0.2% THC’, citing the exemption example given above. Further confusion arises from Home Office guidance, which states that CBD rich hemp can be legally grown in the UK, providing it is from approved seeds and the end product contains less than 0.2% THC. However, to grow this hemp, farmers must first obtain a hemp cultivation licence, and even then can only keep the seeds and fibres of the plant. All other parts of the plant, including the buds and flowers, must be destroyed. So even CBD flowers grown with a Home Office licence in the UK with less than 0.2% THC would still be considered illegal, and must not be sold online or in retail stores.




To clarify the matter, a prominent cannabis campaigner, Peter Reynolds, wrote to the Home Office, asking them to confirm the law. This was the response:




“Thank you for your email.




I can confirm that the leaves and flowers of the genus Cannabis are controlled and defined as cannabis as outlined in Section 37(1) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971




“cannabis” (except in the expression “cannabis resin”) means any plant of the genus cannabis or any part of any such plant (by whatever name designated) except that it does not include cannabis resin or any of the following products after separation from the rest of the plant, namely—


(a)mature stalk of any such plant,


(b)fibre produced from mature stalk of any such plant, and


(c)seed of any such plant;”.




Once the separation of the stalk and seeds from the plant has occurred it will not be defined as cannabis. This also extends to the fibre produced from the stalk.




Regards




Jill Frankham


Senior Compliance Officer


Drugs & Firearms Licensing Unit”




Why are CBD flowers still on sale in the UK if they are illegal?


Despite all of the above, many stores online and offline continue to flout the law. Unfortunately, ignorance is not considered a defence when it comes to criminal matters. In 2020 a number of CBD shops across the country were raided for selling CBD flowers. In one case, police involved in the operation were clear, stating that they believed the shops had been attempting to exploit a “loophole” that allows certain stores to sell cannabis containing up to 0.2% THC, though this in fact only applies to licensed pharmacies selling to people with a specific prescription.




“Unless you are a specifically licensed pharmacy, you cannot legally sell or supply cannabis or THC products – no matter what percentage content it has,” Police Constable Ross Bennett who investigated the case said.




How can I buy CBD flowers legally in the UK?


Until the law is updated to take into account the difference between CBD flowers and high THC cannabis, there is no legal way to buy CBD flowers online or in-store in the UK. The only legal way to possess cannabis is by obtaining a prescription. Since November 2018, it has been possible for cannabis to be prescribed for medical purposes only. It is difficult to obtain a medical cannabis prescription on the NHS, however, there are a number of private cannabis clinics that will issue prescriptions for genuine cases. Costs are prohibitive, but as more clinics open the cost for consultations and legally available products comes down. If you wish to be able to buy and possess CBD flowers of any form of cannabis in the UK, you will need to do so via a prescription.




Are CBD buds illegal in the UK?


‘CBD flower’ is easy to find online and on the high street. But what does the law say?




CBD weed, buds, hemp flower. Whatever you call it, there’s a lot of it around.


From vape shops to head shops to online stores, CBD buds are widely available. And some sellers claim, completely legal.




Packed with CBD and with minor cannabinoids like CBG and CBC, these flowers often come with rich terpene profiles to deliver that sought-after entourage effect.




Raw cannabis is very popular with both medical and recreational users for this very reason.




All about the THC?


The laws around CBD in the UK are notoriously confusing, even in 2021 when the public is pretty clued up about it.




One such law is the EU’s 0.2% THC cap. Consumers often interpret this to mean that CBD buds are legal as long as they contain less than 0.2% THC.




This tallies with the legal thinking in the US, where buds containing less than 0.3% THC can be sold legally.




Meanwhile, in Switzerland, the cap is 1% of the weight of the flower.




But the reality in the UK is not that straight forward.




CBD vs cannabis vs hemp




Cannabis is a Class B controlled drug under Schedule 1 of the Misuse of Drugs Regulations (MDR) 2001.




This classification applies to high-THC varieties and low-THC ‘hemp’ varieties, from which CBD can be legally extracted.




Farming hemp must contain no more than 0.2% THC and only the fibre and seeds can be processed for commercial use, if the grower has a license to do so.




The rest of the plant, including the flower, has to be destroyed.




Home Office Industrial Hemp guidance states:




“The ‘0.2%’ reference is used solely to identify varieties which may potentially be cultivated, within the scope of this policy, and to differentiate between the fee level is applicable under the Misuse of Drugs (Fees) Regulations 2010.”




Finished CBD products like tinctures and edibles should contain no more than 1mg of THC per container.




But this is irrelevant in the case of flower which is a Class B drug regardless of THC content.




Enforcement




Many retailers selling CBD buds are unaware that they are illegal, understandably confused by the supposedly iron-clad ‘THC rule.’




But British police maintain that ignorance is no excuse for breaking the law.




Numerous shops selling cannabis flower have been raided under the Misuse of Drugs act.




In August, police in Croydon seized a ‘large quantity’ of cannabis from three shops labelled as legal CBD suppliers.




Four people were arrested on suspicion of being concerned in the supply and importation of a Class B drug.




Police Constable Ross Bennett who investigated the case, said:




“It is also not a defence to tell officers that you thought your cannabis was legal because you bought it from a CBD shop – it is a class B drug and you will be dealt with accordingly.